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Net

The sum that remains following all permissible deductions, including charges, expenses, discounts, commissions, or taxes.

Net assets, for example, are what remain after an individual subtracts the amount owed to creditors from his or her assets. Net pay is the salary an individual actually receives after deductions such as Income Tax and Social Security payments.

net

n., adj. the amount of money or value remaining after all costs, losses, taxes, depreciation of value, and other expenses and deductions have been paid and/or subtracted. Thus the term is used in net profit, net income, net loss, net worth, or net estate.

net

adjective clear, irreducible, leftover, remaining, residual, residuary, surplus, surviving, unexpended
Associated concepts: net assets, net balance, net capital stock, net earnings, net estate, net income, net loss, net premium, net price, net proceeds, net profit, net rents, net revenues, net value, net worth
See also: capture, earn, ensnare, gain, realize, trap
References in classic literature ?
Jones the fishermen prepared to launch their boat, which had been seen in the background of the view, with the net carefully disposed on a little platform in its stern, ready for service.
Benjamin Pump was invariably the coxswain and net caster of Richard’s boat, unless the sheriff saw fit to preside in person: and, on the present occasion, Billy Kirby, and a youth of about half his strength, were assigned to the oars.
A long time was passed in this necessary part of the process, for Benjamin prided himself greatly on his skill in throwing the net, and, in fact, most of the success of the sport depended on its being done with judgment.
In place of the falling net were now to be heard the quick strokes of the oars, and the noise of the rope running out of the boat.
Your net and box would have told me as much," said I, "for I knew that Mr.
To my dismay the creature flew straight for the great mire, and my acquaintance never paused for an instant, bounding from tuft to tuft behind it, his green net waving in the air.
During our different passages south of the Plata, I often towed astern a net made of bunting, and thus caught many curious animals.
south of Cape Horn, the net was put astern several times; it never, however, brought up anything besides a few of two extremely minute species of Entomostraca.
I may also mention, that having used the net during one night, I allowed it to become partially dry, and having occasion twelve hours afterwards to employ it again, I found the whole surface sparkled as brightly as when first taken out of the water.
When the Fisherman pulled the net out of the sea, he cried out joyfully:
The Fisherman took the net and the fish to the cave, a dark, gloomy, smoky place.
He put a hand as big as a spade into the net and pulled out a handful of mullets.