nothing

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nothing

(Void), noun blank, clean slate, emptiness, empty feeling, empty space, inanity, nothingness, vacuity, vacuum
Associated concepts: nothing but the truth, nothing to hide

nothing

(Zero), noun naught, nil, none, not one iota, nothing at all, nothing whatever
See also: blank, nonentity, nullity
References in periodicals archive ?
Without him we created next to nothing in that opening hour.
HOUSEHOLDERS can pick up a home bargain for next to nothing.
I know quite a lot about how the animals behave above ground, but next to nothing about their lives underground," he said.
With interest rates on bank deposits paying next to nothing these days, savers have flocked to better-yielding investments.
Considering what he could have earned he's going away with next to nothing.
It was a national scandal that Ben, the most severely injured surviving soldier who served in Afghanistan, faced being kicked out and having his medical treatment cut to next to nothing.
They treated themselves to fatty foods and carbonated beverages, receiving next to nothing in real nutritional value by my reckoning, and the credit card company picked up the bill.
Lars Brunner, the scientist in charge of the trials, said: "Kelp costs next to nothing and it's remarkably easy to convert into energy.
Browndo9 He looked very good last time, but to back him in Germany takes courage given that we know next to nothing about most of the other runners.
If that state of affairs is unchanged, one could walk into certain schools tomorrow and, even after a year''s work, one would find class after class which have been taught next to nothing, have next to nothing in their exercise books and know next to nothing.
But the money he has spent adds up to quite a tidy sum, compared to the likes of Kenny Jackett at Millwall, who has spent next to nothing.
About 25 per cent of those over 55 believed that their chances of acquiring an STI from unprotected sex were next to nothing, compared to 13 per cent of those aged 18-24.