no-fault


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no-fault

a convenient phrase used to describe compensation systems that do not depend upon the claimant establishing the fault of some other person. The most often discussed is the New Zealand ACCIDENT COMPENSATION system. However, even in the UK interstitial reform is bringing about a larger area of no-fault liability, some within the delict/tort system and some of it outside. See ACCIDENT, ANIMAL LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
NICB has seen significant increases in questionable no-fault activity as organized criminal rings migrate from Florida and New York to other states like Minnesota that have no-fault laws in place.
The call for evidence confirms that compensated no-fault dismissals would enable micro-businesses to dismiss employees without a formal dismissal procedure where no fault was identified on their part, provided that the employee receives a set amount of compensation.
Florida's no-fault system was created with the intent of providing affordable, quick and fair compensation to accident victims, without regard to fault.
This increase came despite efforts to curb abuses and fraud in the no-fault system.
On Thursday, the Assembly overwhelmingly approved no-fault divorce, allowing couples to split without one of the spouses taking the blame for the marriage's failure.
McGovern and others have said no-fault insurance agreements between rail companies and Amtrak have soaked up too many tax dollars.
On the one hand, freedom rightly understood (as distinguished from no-fault freedom) requires an orientation toward duty and the common good.
So no-fault insurance makes good drivers pay for bad ones.
In the 37 states that adopted no-fault divorce in the early 1970S (all but five states now allow unilateral divorce), female suicide has fallen by 5 percent to 10 percent, spousal abuse has dropped by about a third, and murder of wives has declined by about 10 percent.
In August 1996, however, Walker sued Stein alleging she had sustained serious enough injury to exceed the state's no-fault threshold.
It has now come time for us to put up our dukes and fight it out for no-fault insurance.
Current discussions have focused on the "choice" system, under which insureds are allowed to select either a tort system or a no-fault system of compensation at the time of insurance purchase.