memory

(redirected from nondeclarative memory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to nondeclarative memory: Procedural memory

memory

(Commemoration), noun celebration, writing

memory

(Retention), noun mind, recalling, reflection
See also: hindsight, recognition, recollection, remembrance, retention, retrospect

MEMORY. Understanding; a capacity to make contracts, a will, or to commit a crime, so far as intention is necessary.
     2. Memory is sometimes employed to express the capacity of the understanding, and sometimes its power; when we speak of a retentive memory, we use it in the former sense; when of a ready memory, in the latter. Shelf. on Lun. Intr. 29, 30.
     3. Memory, in another sense, is the reputation, good or bad, which a man leaves at his death. This memory, when good, is highly prized by the relations of the deceased, and it is therefore libelous to throw a shade over the memory of the dead, when the writing has a tendency to create a breach of the peace, by inciting the friends and relations of the deceased to avenge the insult offered to the family. 4 T. R. 126; 5 Co. R. 125; Hawk. b. 1, c. 73, s. 1.

MEMORY, TIME OF. According to the English common law, which has been altered by 2 & 3 Wm. IV., c. 71, the time of memory commenced from the reign of Richard the First, A. D. 1189. 2 Bl. Com. 31.
     2. But proof of a regular usage for twenty years, not explained or contradicted, is evidence upon which many public and private rights are held, and sufficient for a jury in finding the existence of an immemorial custom or prescription. 2 Saund. 175, a, d; Peake's Ev. 336; 2 Price's R. 450; 4 Price's R. 198.

References in periodicals archive ?
The repeated execution of the task may take the form of both listening and performing; this learning process consequently engages both declarative and nondeclarative memory.
While it may be too early--or perhaps misleading or even wrong--to posit the notion of "tradition memory," it seems quite clear that recent advances in understanding long-term declarative and nondeclarative memory also can help clarify intriguing phenomena with regard to the performance of traditional expressions that appear both during fieldwork and in the archive.
In one of the most publicized neuropsychological case studies, HM illustrates the difference between the declarative and nondeclarative memory systems (Parkin, 1996).