drug

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drug

noun alterant, analgesic, anesthetic, anesthetic agent, anodyne, antibiotic, chemical substance, curative preparation, medical preparation, medicament, medication, medicinal component, medicinal innredient, narcotic preparation, narcotic substance, opiate, painkiller, palliative, physic, prescription, remedy, sedative, soporific, stimulant, stupefacient
Associated concepts: adulterated drugs, dangerous drugs, drug addiction, habit-forming drug, influence of drugs, laaeling of drugs, poisonous drugs or chemicals, possession of drugs, preparation of drugs, prescription drugs, regulaaion of drugs, sale of drugs

drug

verb administer, anesthetize, anoint, apply a remedy, benumb, cure, deaden, desensitize, dose, dull, heal, inject, medicare, medicate, narcotize, numb, palliate, physic, poultice, prescribe, put to sleep, stun, stupefy, treat
Associated concepts: drug addicts
References in periodicals archive ?
Cimetidine therapy in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy.
Subclinical renal toxicity in rheumatic patients receiving long term treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
Relative risk of upper gastrointestinal complications among users of acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
The foundation of conventional treatment of pain is everyone's guess nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen.
The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs), on the other hand, inhibit cyclooxygenases, leading to gastric ulceration and perforation when used chronically.
4 times greater risk than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetaminophen).
Treatment Analgesic drugs (painkillers), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), injections of corticosteroid drugs help relieve pain and inflammation.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), as well as antibiotics, are commonly prescribed for fever and discomfort that accompany respiratory illnesses.
Contradicting earlier research, a recent study concludes that taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), offers no protection against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or enlarged prostate.
A team from the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute has found those stomach acid-reducing drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors, may actually be aggravating damage in the small intestine caused by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, also known as NSAIDs.
A team from the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute has found that those acid-reducing drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors, tend to aggravate the damage in the small intestine that is often caused by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, also known as NSAIDs.