not consider

References in classic literature ?
I hope, Marianne," continued Elinor, "you do not consider him as deficient in general taste.
But as the lion's head appeared to be in no haste to speak, and as there was no record or tradition of its having spoken during the whole existence of the chair, Grandfather did not consider it worth while to wait.
I do not consider that the cigars and whisky he consumed at my expense (he always refused cocktails, since he was practically a teetotaller), and the few dollars, borrowed with a civil air of conferring a favour upon me, that passed from my pocket to his, were in any way equivalent to the entertainment he afforded me.
This occasioned a thousand fond and tender thoughts, which we would dwell longer upon, did we not consider that such kind of lovers will make a very inconsiderable part of our readers.
Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.
But I did not consider these points at the time, and so my reasoning was dead against the chances of the invaders.
Rachel, practical soul though she was, did not consider them the one essential.
And yet, if the truth must be told, this wretch, who had stolen what was the boast of man, and the dowry of a woman, did not consider himself as a thief.
Besides which, sir, he is but a young man himself and I do not consider "thank'ee Sim," a proper form of address on those occasions.
he was sure a gentleman of Mr Sparkler's fine sense would interpret him with all delicacy), that he could not consider this proposal definitely determined on, until he should have had the privilege of holding some correspondence with Mr Merdle; and of ascertaining it to be so far accordant with the views of that eminent gentleman as that his (Mr Dorrit's) daughter would be received on that footing which her station in life and her dowry and expectations warranted him in requiring that she should maintain in what he trusted he might be allowed, without the appearance of being mercenary, to call the Eye of the Great World.
He added that the sum would have been left her all the same in his will, and that therefore she must not consider the gift as in any way an indemnification to her for anything, but that there was no reason, after all, why a man should not be allowed to entertain a natural desire to lighten his conscience, etc.
Knightley, if you will not consider me as doing a very rude thing, I shall take Emma's advice and go out for a quarter of an hour.