notoriety


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

notoriety

noun attaint, bad report, bad reputation, bad repute, bruit, celebrity, censure, conspicuousness, dedecoration, degradation, denunciation, disapprobation, discredit, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disreputability, disreputableness, disrepute, distinction, eclat, eminence, fama, fame, flagrancy, ignominy, ignomy, ill repute, imputation, indignity, infamia, infamousness, infamy, ingloriousness, loss of honor, loss of reputation, name, notability, obloquy, odium, opprobrium, popular repute, prominence, public notice, publicity, recognition, renown, reproach, reputation, repute, scandal, shame, slur, stigma, stigmatization, taint, unrespectability
See also: bad repute, character, common knowledge, disgrace, dishonor, infamy, opprobrium, prestige, publicity, reputation, scandal, shame, stigma

NOTORIETY, evidence. That which is generally known.
     2. This notoriety is of fact or of law. In general, the notoriety of a fact is not sufficient to found a judgment or to rely on its truth; 1 Ohio Rep. 207; but there are some facts of which, in consequence of their notoriety, the court will, suo motu, take cognizance; for example, facts stated in ancient histories; Skin. 14; 1 Ventr. R. 149; 2 East, Rep. 464; 9 Ves. jr. 347; 10 Ves.jr. 854; 8 John. Rep. 385; 1 Binn. R. 399; recitals in statutes; Co. Lit. 19 b; 4 M. & S. 542; and in the law text books; 4 Inst. 240; 2 Rags. 313; and the journals of the legislatures, are considered of such notoriety that they need not be otherwise proved.
     3. The courts of the United States take judicial notice of the, ports and waters of the United States, in, which the tide ebbs and flows. 3 Dall. 297; 9 Wheat. 374; 10 Wheat. 428; 7 Pet. 342. They take like notice of the boundaries, of the several states and judicial districts. It would be altogether unnecessary, if not absurd, to prove the fact that London in Great Britain or Paris in France, is not within the jurisdiction of an American court, because the fact is notoriously known.
     4. It is difficult to say what will amount to such notoriety as to render any other proof unnecessary. This must depend upon many circumstances; in one case, perhaps upon the progress of human knowledge in the fields of science; in another, on the extent of information on the state of foreign countries, and in all such instances upon the accident of their being little known or publicly communicated. The notoriety of the law is such that the judges are always bound to take notice of it; statutes, precedents and text books are therefore evidence, without any other proof than, their production. Gresley, Ev. 293. The courts of the United States take judicial notice of all laws and jurisprudence of the several states in which they exercise original or appellate jurisdiction. 9 Pet. 607, 624.
     5. The doctrine of the civil and canon laws is similar to this. Boehmer in tit. 10, de probat. lib. 2, t. 19, n. 2; Mascardus, de probat conclus. 1106, 1107, et seq.; Menock. de praesumpt. lib. 1, quaest. 63, &c.; Toullier Dr. Civ. Frau. liv. 3, c. 6, n. 13; Diet. de Jurisp. mot Notoriete; 1 Th. Co. Lit. 26, n. 16; 2 Id. 63, n. A; Id. 334, n. 6; Id. 513, n. T 3; 9 Dana, 23 12 Vern. 178; 5 Port. 382; 1 Chit. PI. 216, 225.

References in classic literature ?
So far as I could see, the party had already gained some notoriety in the place, which had come to look upon the General as a Russian nobleman of great wealth.
Indeed, some of them had acquired great notoriety for deeds of hardihood and courage; for the fur trade had Its heroes, whose names resounded throughout the wilderness.
But still more, this craving for notoriety was a symptom of the intense morbidness which now pervaded his nature.
Everybody of any consequence or notoriety in Bath was well know by name to Mrs Smith.
Even Professors might be misled by the desire for notoriety.
She would abandon every topic to inveigh against those women who (instead of minding their houses and their children) seek notoriety by print.
All I feared was to bring notoriety, scandal, on the family--on you and May.
Jarndyce had fallen into this company in the tenderness of his heart and his earnest desire to do all the good in his power; but that he felt it to be too often an unsatisfactory company, where benevolence took spasmodic forms, where charity was assumed as a regular uniform by loud professors and speculators in cheap notoriety, vehement in profession, restless and vain in action, servile in the last degree of meanness to the great, adulatory of one another, and intolerable to those who were anxious quietly to help the weak from failing rather than with a great deal of bluster and self-laudation to raise them up a little way when they were down, he plainly told us.
I would not have gone into this dissertation upon Syrian villages but for the fact that Nimrod, the Mighty Hunter of Scriptural notoriety, is buried in Jonesborough, and I wished the public to know about how he is located.
And when such as had come in contact with Strickland in the past, writers who had known him in London, painters who had met him in the cafes of Montmartre, discovered to their amazement that where they had seen but an unsuccessful artist, like another, authentic genius had rubbed shoulders with them there began to appear in the magazines of France and America a succession of articles, the reminiscences of one, the appreciation of another, which added to Strickland's notoriety, and fed without satisfying the curiosity of the public.
The hussies were got up to resemble the music-hall artiste or the dancer who enjoyed notoriety at the moment; their eyes were heavy with black and their cheeks impudently scarlet.
This young lady sang very well; in fact, her music had given a kind of notoriety to their little house.