nudge


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.
See: jostle
References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan glanced at Athos and Aramis and for the first time replied to Porthos's nudge of the knee by a nudge responsive.
He gave Porthos a second nudge of the knee and Porthos got up as if to stretch his legs and took care at the same time to ascertain that his sword could be drawn smoothly from the scabbard.
Former UK Prime Minister David Cameron's Behavioral Insights Team was the first government agency focussed on nudging, or nudge unit, in the world, and was soon followed by other governments, including former US President Barack Obama's Social and Behavioral Science Team.
Summary: Fadi Maki is the man looking to subtly encourage Lebanon into making better choices, using the rising star of economic theory -- nudge.
TRAINER David Dennis is among those anxiously awaiting the release of the PS1 million Randox Health Grand National weights this evening, in his case for Welsh Grand National third Final Nudge.
BY NEWSBOY FINAL NUDGE (nap) can be a muddy marvel in the rescheduled Coral Welsh Grand National (2.
We will open nudge idea competitions nationwide starting next year," the Ministry of Strategy and Finance said at the Seoul Government Complex in Gwanghwamun District, Seoul, Wednesday.
NUDGE' has become quite the buzzword in recent years, with nudge theory employed by governments around the world to encourage citizens to do things like pay their taxes on time, or sign up to a pension.
Sunstein argue that government "choice architects" can nudge individuals away from numerous unconscious and irrational decisions that stem from a whole host of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors.
In this Article, a nudge is defined as any aspect of choice architecture or any method of structuring the choice environment that influences behavior in a predictable way, with the restriction that this tool may not constrain or remove choices nor can it significantly increase the cost associated with any of the options.
In their book Nudge, Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein argue that government "choice architects" can nudge individuals away from numerous unconscious and irrational decisions that stem from a whole host of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors.
If people are asked to assume that the System 1 nudge is significantly more effective, then many of them will shift to preferring the System 1 nudge.