nuncupative will


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Nuncupative Will

The oral expression of a person's wishes as to the disposition of his or her property to be performed or to take effect after the person's death, dictated by the person in his or her final illness before a sufficient number of witnesses and afterward reduced to writing. Such wills are invalid in certain states and in others are valid only under certain circumstances.

nuncupative will

see PRIVILEGED WILLS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inheritance scholars have deplored nuncupative wills as "obsolescent and outmoded" (307) at the same time as evidence scholars have condemned the dead man's statute as a "relic.
Without reconfiguring the categories, each one would remain technically isolated, so that rulings on, say, the meaning of a "near death" transfer within the law of gifts causa mortis would fail to pertain to nuncupative wills.
For an early criticism of the requirements for nuncupative wills set out in the English statute of frauds, see Bentham, supra note 66, at 545-47.
section][section] 91-5-15, 91-5-17 (2013) (neither limiting value nor barring realty and also allowing unwitnessed nuncupative wills if the total value of bequests is no greater than $100); Mo.
A proposed provision for nuncupative wills appeared in an early draft of the Uniform Probate Code, see Unif.
In a few early instances, oral instructions for the preparation of improperly formalized written wills were given effect as nuncupative wills, see Offutt v.
1916) ("With the growth of learning and progress of letters, the necessity for nuncupative wills ceased to exist.