object


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to object: Object Oriented Programming

Object

As a verb, to take exception to something; to declare or express the belief that something is improper or illegal.As a noun, the thing sought to be accomplished or attained; aim; purpose; intention.

One might, for example, object to the admission of particular evidence at a trial.

The object of a civil suit, for example, might be to be compensated in the form of damages for an injury incurred.

object

1) v. to ask the court not to allow a particular question asked of a witness by the opposing lawyer on the basis that it is either legally not permitted or in its wording is confusing or improper in its "form." An attorney may also object to an answer on the basis that it is not "responsive," to the question, on the basis a witness is limited to answering a question and is not allowed to make unsolicited comments. The trial attorney must be alert and quick in order to object before the witness answers. This is called an "objection" and must be based on a specific list of legal restrictions on questions. 2) n. a particular thing. 3) n. an aim or purpose, as "the object of the contract..." (See: objection)

object

noun aim, butt, commodity, concern, corporeal body, design, destination, end, final cause, finis, goal, item, material product, material substance, matter, point, propositum, purpose, subject, substance, target, ultimate purpose

object

verb attack, be at variance, be averse, call in question, challenge, complain, contra dicere recusare, controvert, criticize, demur, disagree, disapprove, dispute, dissent, enter a demurrer, enter a protest, except, express an objection, express disapproval, find fault, oppose, protest, put forward in opposition, quarrel, resist, state by way of objection, state opposition, take exception
See also: article, ban, basis, cause, collide, complain, condemn, conflict, confront, connotation, content, contest, counter, counteract, criticize, demonstrate, demur, deprecate, design, destination, determinant, disaccord, disagree, disallow, disapprove, disown, dissent, doubt, end, entity, expostulate, fight, goal, idea, intent, intention, item, meaning, motive, negate, oppose, oppugn, point, predetermination, project, protest, purpose, pursuit, reason, recipient, reject, remonstrate, reprehend, signification, target
References in classic literature ?
There are two different kinds of realism, according as we make a thought consist of act and object, or of object alone.
The relation itself is a part of pure experience; one of its 'terms' becomes the subject or bearer of the knowledge, the knower, the other becomes the object known"(p.
After mentioning the duality of subject and object, which is supposed to constitute consciousness, he proceeds in italics: "EXPERIENCE, I BELIEVE, HAS NO SUCH INNER DUPLICITY; AND THE SEPARATION OF IT INTO CONSCIOUSNESS AND CONTENT COMES, NOT BY WAY OF SUBTRACTION, BUT BY WAY OF ADDITION"(p.
In this first lecture I shall be concerned to refute a theory which is widely held, and which I formerly held myself: the theory that the essence of everything mental is a certain quite peculiar something called "consciousness," conceived either as a relation to objects, or as a pervading quality of psychical phenomena.
Or is it something complex, perhaps consisting in our way of behaving in the presence of objects, or, alternatively, in the existence in us of things called "ideas," having a certain relation to objects, though different from them, and only symbolically representative of them?
For the moment, I am merely concerned to note that perception of objects is one of the most obvious examples of what is called "consciousness.
You may be conscious of a friend either by seeing him or by "thinking" of him; and by "thought" you can be conscious of objects which cannot be seen, such as the human race, or physiology.
Accordingly they maintain that in knowledge we are in direct contact with objects, which may be, and usually are, outside our own minds.
There is, I mean, no aboriginal stuff or quality of being, contrasted with that of which material objects are made, out of which our thoughts of them are made; but there is a function in experience which thoughts perform, and for the performance of which this quality of being is invoked.
The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the
Even those, however, which are purely mental will not have that intrinsic reference to objects which Brentano assigns to them and which constitutes the essence of "consciousness" as ordinarily understood.
The extremely slow motion of the object, now dubbed Sedna (SN: 3/20/04, p.