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As occurrent entities, they happen, but they themselves cannot change.
54) Rather, Duff contends that we can glean the actor's attitude from the character of the action: "an agent's indifference to a risk which she creates is a matter not of her occurrent feelings, but of the meaning of her actions.
According to Belot, the notion of geometric possibility involved need not be assumed to be primitive: we may be able to base it in occurrent geometric properties and relations (the position can be 'grounded').
The view that intentions are practical commitments that cause and explain the agent's intentional behavior can underwrite the distinction between aim and side effect in a metaphysically substantial way that does not simply make incorrigible the agent's occurrent thought or what he is disposed to say about his actions.
If Jones is gripped by an occurrent desire to go partying, he may let this desire distract him from deliberating about why partying is not a good idea the night before an important medical exam for which he needs to study.
H, on the other hand, champions Professor C'S occurrent, experiential interests, taking his patient's consent to lifesaving bypass surgery as an indication that he may have changed his mind about what he wants.
Cartesian space is occurrent space for Heidegger, measurable in physical terms.
Happiness in the truest sense, then, is a matter of central affective states and mood propensities, not just of occurrent feelings, but of 'overall emotional states and dispositions'.
The first variation restricts the evidence thesis to occurrent knowledge; the second requires for knowledge that one's belief could be based on evidence; and the third requires for knowledge that the belief was based on evidence at a suitable prior time.
Many of these desires will be occurrent, such as my present desire to drink some beer.
Pointing to occurrent phenomenal states, he claims that phenomenal demonstratives are non-conceptual, causally individuated attention control structures.
The story goes like this: The laws are true because the occurrent facts are what they are.