offence


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Related to offence: Summary offence
See: crime

offence

see CRIME.

OFFENCE, crimes. The doing that which a penal law forbids to be done, or omitting to do what it commands; in this sense it is nearly synonymous with crime. (q.v.) In a more confined sense, it may be considered as having the same meaning with misdemeanor, (q.v.) but it differs from it in this, that it is not indictable, but punishable summarily by the forfeiture of a penalty. 1 Chit. Prac. 14.

References in classic literature ?
This was all I heard that night before my sister clutched me, as a slumberous offence to the company's eyesight, and assisted me up to bed with such a strong hand that I seemed to have fifty boots on, and to be dangling them all against the edges of the stairs.
Thou canst not have had time to commit any new offence since that time?
Well, sir," said the captain, "better speak plain, I believe, even at the risk of offence.
and that was not to eat bread from a table-cloth, nor embrace his wife, and other points which, though I cannot now call them to mind, I here grant as expressed) until I take complete vengeance upon him who has committed such an offence against me.
For some offence he was exiled, and the royal pardon found him far too occupied to dream of return.
The present chapter has given greater offence than any other
Bursting into an unspeakable frenzy, I was at once going to call upon this villain of a seducer--though what to do next I knew not, seeing that I was fearful of giving you offence.
Surely, sir,” cried the impatient Elizabeth, “those laws that condemn a man like the Leather-Stocking to so severe a punishment, for an offence that even I must think very venial, cannot be perfect in themselves.
And Solomon, I am sure, saith, It is the glory of a man, to pass by an offence.
She knew not how such an offence as hers might be classed by the laws of worldly politeness, to what a degree of unforgivingness it might with propriety lead, nor to what rigours of rudeness in return it might justly make her amenable.
It irritated him that when he tried to be agreeable with a woman she should take offence.
1886, and abode in it until 1892, made it at once the scene of such constant offence that he had no time, if he had the temper, for defence.