wife

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wife

a married woman.

WIFE, domestic relations. A woman who has a husband.
     2. A wife, as such, possesses rights and is liable to obligations. These will be considered. 1st. She may make contracts for the purchase of real estate for her own benefit, unless her husband expressly dissents. 6 Binn. R. 427. And she is entitled to a legacy directly given to her for her separate use. 6 Serg. & Rawle, R. 467. In some places, by statutory provision, she may act as a feme sole trader, and as such acquire personal property. 2 Serg. & Rawle, R. 289.
     3. 2d. She may in Pennsylvania, and in most other states, convey her interest in her own or her husband's lands by deed acknowledged in a form prescribed by law. 8 Dowl. R. 630.
     4.-3d. She is under obligation to love, honor and obey her husband and is bound to follow him wherever he may desire to establish himself: 5 N. S. 60; (it is presumed not out of the boundaries of the United States,) unless the husband, by acts of injustice and such as are contrary to his marital duties, renders her life or happiness insecure.
     5.-4th. She is not liable for any obligations she enters into to pay money on any contract she makes, while she lives with her husband; she is presumed in such case to act as the agent of her husband. Chitty, Contr. 43
     6.-5th. The incapacities of femes covert, apply to their civil rights, and are intended for their protection and interest. Their political rights stand upon different grounds, they can, therefore, acquire and lose a national character. These rights stand upon the general principles of the law of nations. Harp. Eq. R. 5 3 Pet. R. 242.
     7.-6th. A wife, like all other persons, when she acts with freedom, may be punished for her criminal acts. But the law presumes, when she commits in his presence a crime, not malum in se, as murder or treason, that she acts by the command and coercion of her husband, and, upon this ground, she is exempted from punishment. Rose. on Cr. Ev. 785. But this is only a presumption of law, and if it appears, upon the evidence, that she did not in fact commit the act under compulsion, but was herself a principal actor and inciter in it, she may be punished. 1 Hale, P. C. 516; 1 Russ. on Cr. 16, 20. Vide Contract; Divorce; Husband; Incapacity; Marriage; Necessaries; Parties to actions; Parties to contracts; Women and, generally, Bouv. Inst. Index,

References in periodicals archive ?
While rules-of-thumb, like some old wives' tales, can have a modicum of truth, they can be significantly wild off the mark in valuing any given brand or distributor operation.
Here, we take a look at some other old wives' tales to find out what ones have a basis in fact and which ones are nothing but stuff and nonsense.
ONE of the barmiest old wives' tales says mums who want a boy should only eat bread crusts.
The old wives' tale of carrots helping you see in the dark is actually true - vegetables such as carrots and parsnips are high in Vitamin A, an essential vitamin in helping night vision.
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine also found that the old wives' tale about morning sickness being a sign of a healthy pregnancy may be true.
But now university boffins claim the old wives' tale could actually be true - if you're cold you'll catch a cold.
ATHIS old wives' tale has some grounding in fact as the butter will encourage cats to groom themselves which relaxes them.
I had read about the old wives' tale that a spicy curry can help speed up delivery," the Sun quoted teacher Esther, 28, as saying.
Enter your tale marking which category you're entering - either Old Wives' Tale for advice passed on by your grandma, your mum or his mum - or New Wives' Tale if your story is a modern myth.
ATHIS old wives' tale does have some truth in that the nails and razor blades will go rusty and release iron that is essential for unlocking the nutrients that influence the flower colour of hydrangeas.
There is a widespread notion that the amount of water applied to the soil around a fruit tree affects the sweetness of the fruit, but this seems to be nothing more than an old wives' tale.