open

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Open

To make accessible, visible, or available; to submit to review, examination, or inquiry through the elimination of restrictions or impediments.

To open a judgment means to render it capable of reexamination by removing or relaxing the bar of its finality. A judgment is ordinarily opened at the insistence of a party who is able to show good cause as to why the execution of the judgment would be inequitable.

To open a court is to formally announce, ordinarily through the bailiff, that the session has commenced and that the business before the tribunal will proceed.

The term open is also used as an adjective in reference to that which is patent, visible, apparent, or notorious, such as a defect in a product, or conduct such as lewdness.

open

(Accessible), adjective allowable, allowed, approachable, attainable, available, defenseless, fit for travel, free of access, free to all, insecure, navigable, obtainable, patere, permitted, pregnable, procurable, public, securable, susceptible, unbarred, unblocked, unenclosed, unfenced, unfortified, unguarded, unlocked, unobstructed, unoccupied, unrestricted, unshielded, vacated, vulnerable, within reach
Associated concepts: open account, open market, open shop

open

(In sight), adjective apparent, bare, blatant, clarus, clear, conspicuous, discernible, distinct, evident, exposed, exposed to view, glaring, in full view, manifest, manifestus, marked, noticeable, observable, obvious, outstanding, overt, patent, perceivable, perceptible, perspicuous, plain, prominent, pronounced, recognizable, revealed, salient, seeable, transparent, unclouded, unconcealed, uncovered, undisguised, unhidden, unmistakable, unobstructed, unsecluded, unsheltered, unshielded, visible
Associated concepts: open and notorious possession, open court

open

(Persuasible), adjective acquiescent, amenable, apertus, candidus, flexible, impressible, impressionable, inducible, influenceable, malleable, movable, persuadable, pervious, receptive, respondent, sensitive, simplex, suasible, suggestible, swayable, sympathetic, tractable

open

(Unclosed), adjective adapertus, agape, ajar, coverless, dehiscent, gaping, lidless, patens, patulous, spacious, spread out, unclogged, uncorked, unfastened, unfurled, unlatched, unlocked, unsealed, unshut, unstoppered, wide, yawning
See also: aleatory, apparent, available, bare, bona fide, break, candid, commence, conspicuous, denude, direct, equivocal, establish, evident, explicit, flagrant, forthright, generate, honest, impartial, indeterminate, ingenuous, initiate, launch, liberal, manifest, naive, naked, obvious, open-minded, originate, outstanding, overt, passable, patent, penetrable, perceivable, perceptible, preface, pullulate, receptive, reveal, scrutable, separate, simple, sincere, split, spread, straightforward, suasible, subject, susceptible, unaffected, unbiased, uncertain, undecided, unmistakable, unprejudiced, unrestricted, unsettled, vacant, vulnerable

TO OPEN, OPENING. To open a case is to make a statement of the pleadings in a case, which is called the opening.
     2. The opening should be concise, very distinct and perspicuous. Its use is to enable the judge and jury to direct their attention to the real merits of the case, and the points in issue. 1 Stark. R. 439;S. C. 2 E. C. L. R. 462; 2 Stark. R. 31; S. C 3 Eng. C. L. R. 230.
     3. The opening address or speech is that made immediately after the evidence has been closed; such address usually states, 1st. The full extent of the plaintiff's claims, and the circumstances under which they are made, to show that they are just and reasonable. 2d. At least an outline of the evidence by which those claims are to be established. 3d. The legal grounds and authorities in favor of the claim or of the proposed evidence. 4th. An anticipation of the expected defence, and statement of the grounds on which it is futile, "either in law or justice, and the reasons why it ought to fail. 3 Chit. Pr. 881; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3044, et seq. To open a judgment, is to set it aside.

References in periodicals archive ?
The TAVR procedure has proven to be very successful in patients who were not candidates for traditional, open-chest surgery due to advanced age, or because they are too ill or suffering from additional medical conditions," Faraz Kerendi, M.
Our study hypothesis is that open-chest surgery in the lateral position increases the blood concentration of propofol during TCI.
We describe a case of extracardiac mass in a patient submitted to an open-chest coronary artery bypass operation.
Instead HCW told her to have major open-chest surgery.
In 2001, statistics showed the father-of-two performed more open-chest operations on lung cancer patients than any other surgeon in the NHS, putting in around 10 in an average week.
An air ambulance doctor performed open-chest surgery on the pavement to restart his heart but Mr Hegarty died five days later without regaining consciousness.
Patients with the condition, which occurs in around one per cent of the population, experience palpitations and breathlessness, and the conventional treatments are life-long medication or an open-chest surgical procedure.
Unlike other ventricular assist devices (VADs), it can be used in the cardiac catheterization lab without the need for open-chest surgery.
Lord Huntingdon, the former royal trainer, has successfully undergone open-chest surgery in Perth, Western Australia, after developing a serious breathing problem.
Among the animals needing some tender loving care is a horse called Dennis who needs contact lenses, an eight-day-old foal with breathing problems and a spaniel who needs open-chest surgery.