open

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Open

To make accessible, visible, or available; to submit to review, examination, or inquiry through the elimination of restrictions or impediments.

To open a judgment means to render it capable of reexamination by removing or relaxing the bar of its finality. A judgment is ordinarily opened at the insistence of a party who is able to show good cause as to why the execution of the judgment would be inequitable.

To open a court is to formally announce, ordinarily through the bailiff, that the session has commenced and that the business before the tribunal will proceed.

The term open is also used as an adjective in reference to that which is patent, visible, apparent, or notorious, such as a defect in a product, or conduct such as lewdness.

open

(Accessible), adjective allowable, allowed, approachable, attainable, available, defenseless, fit for travel, free of access, free to all, insecure, navigable, obtainable, patere, permitted, pregnable, procurable, public, securable, susceptible, unbarred, unblocked, unenclosed, unfenced, unfortified, unguarded, unlocked, unobstructed, unoccupied, unrestricted, unshielded, vacated, vulnerable, within reach
Associated concepts: open account, open market, open shop

open

(In sight), adjective apparent, bare, blatant, clarus, clear, conspicuous, discernible, distinct, evident, exposed, exposed to view, glaring, in full view, manifest, manifestus, marked, noticeable, observable, obvious, outstanding, overt, patent, perceivable, perceptible, perspicuous, plain, prominent, pronounced, recognizable, revealed, salient, seeable, transparent, unclouded, unconcealed, uncovered, undisguised, unhidden, unmistakable, unobstructed, unsecluded, unsheltered, unshielded, visible
Associated concepts: open and notorious possession, open court

open

(Persuasible), adjective acquiescent, amenable, apertus, candidus, flexible, impressible, impressionable, inducible, influenceable, malleable, movable, persuadable, pervious, receptive, respondent, sensitive, simplex, suasible, suggestible, swayable, sympathetic, tractable

open

(Unclosed), adjective adapertus, agape, ajar, coverless, dehiscent, gaping, lidless, patens, patulous, spacious, spread out, unclogged, uncorked, unfastened, unfurled, unlatched, unlocked, unsealed, unshut, unstoppered, wide, yawning
See also: aleatory, apparent, available, bare, bona fide, break, candid, commence, conspicuous, denude, direct, equivocal, establish, evident, explicit, flagrant, forthright, generate, honest, impartial, indeterminate, ingenuous, initiate, launch, liberal, manifest, naive, naked, obvious, open-minded, originate, outstanding, overt, passable, patent, penetrable, perceivable, perceptible, preface, pullulate, receptive, reveal, scrutable, separate, simple, sincere, split, spread, straightforward, suasible, subject, susceptible, unaffected, unbiased, uncertain, undecided, unmistakable, unprejudiced, unrestricted, unsettled, vacant, vulnerable

TO OPEN, OPENING. To open a case is to make a statement of the pleadings in a case, which is called the opening.
     2. The opening should be concise, very distinct and perspicuous. Its use is to enable the judge and jury to direct their attention to the real merits of the case, and the points in issue. 1 Stark. R. 439;S. C. 2 E. C. L. R. 462; 2 Stark. R. 31; S. C 3 Eng. C. L. R. 230.
     3. The opening address or speech is that made immediately after the evidence has been closed; such address usually states, 1st. The full extent of the plaintiff's claims, and the circumstances under which they are made, to show that they are just and reasonable. 2d. At least an outline of the evidence by which those claims are to be established. 3d. The legal grounds and authorities in favor of the claim or of the proposed evidence. 4th. An anticipation of the expected defence, and statement of the grounds on which it is futile, "either in law or justice, and the reasons why it ought to fail. 3 Chit. Pr. 881; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3044, et seq. To open a judgment, is to set it aside.

References in classic literature ?
When she opens her mouth, it is tragical, but you cannot help thinking of a horse.
Let us, then, all take hold together, with all our might, and see what we can do with this new enterprise, and the whole splendid continent of Africa opens before us and our children.
Every time a German opens his mouth an ALSO falls out; and every time he shuts it he bites one in two that was trying to GET out.
We talked along, and he got out a little hand-bag and begun to open it, and told us to turn our backs.
Through my means, He opens to you a noble career; as my wife only can you enter upon it.
THE warm sunlight of July shining softly through a green blind; an open window with fresh flowers set on the sill; a strange bed, in a strange room; a giant figure of the female sex (like a dream of Mrs.
A dark store-room opens out of it, and that is a place to be run past at night; for I don't know what may be among those tubs and jars and old tea-chests, when there is nobody in there with a dimly-burning light, letting a mouldy air come out of the door, in which there is the smell of soap, pickles, pepper, candles, and coffee, all at one whiff.
A great event in my life, the turning point of my life, now opens on my view.
Ah, London, London, our delight, Great flower that opens but at night, Great city of the midnight sun, Whose day begins when day is done .
Which way I flie is Hell; my self am Hell; And in the lowest deep a lower deep Still threatning to devour me opens wide, To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav'n.
He who first opens Chaucer, or any other ancient poet, is so much struck with the obsolete spelling, multiplied consonants, and antiquated appearance of the language, that he is apt to lay the work down in despair, as encrusted too deep with the rust of antiquity, to permit his judging of its merits or tasting its beauties.
Here,' he said, taking a key from the little bag of life and death, `here is the little bronze key that opens the two ebony caskets on the mantelpiece in the Louis-Philippe room.