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As he simply puts it: 'In the profound boredom with which we are concerned, this corresponds to the absence of any oppressiveness and the lack of mystery in our Dasein' (Heidegger, 1995: p 171).
The boardroom gives the visitor the impression of being inside a beautifully carved wooden box, with any hint of oppressiveness removed by the broad window on one side, part of the glazed end wall of the upper part of an existing brick structure.
Then, the economic crisis hit, and everything Hollande said in his campaign about money and the wealthy makes the French reaction to the oppressiveness of flagrant displays of wealth even sharper.
In today's hectic world, it is imperative that we manage our time well so that we don't need to feel the oppressiveness of incomplete tasks and activities.
This monitor would be an agency of the legislature that could bring the issue of oppressiveness to an administrative agency's attention and then work collaboratively with that agency to resolve or ameliorate the problem.
The weight of it, the oppressiveness of it, wasn't just that Pacquiao lost, it was how he lost.
What is to be destroyed is not foreign but domestic, indeed the very power structure and the set of deeply rooted values which conservative American nurtures: patriarchy, repression of sex (masturbation is now preferable to messing around with women), loss of freedom, oppressiveness, the Puritan morality--"men with characters of rock" is what the world needs, Bill Spangler asserts (424)--and, of course, its condemnation of all that defies labels and categorization; in short, the principles represented by The Project and The Center, the elite members of the organization.
An overt pro-coup stance, which is a temporary attitude, is nothing but tangible oppressiveness in organized form of a mindset favoring military tutelage.
But the oppressiveness of the day-in, day-out drudgery of the families' lives brings home John Donne's saying clearly: No man is an island, and to try to live alone is so impoverishing that most of us naturally struggle against it.
The writing is taut and atmospheric, and the pacing perfectly evokes a feeling of oppressiveness and terror.
The stories in her book highlight the oppressiveness of the regime and of Kurdish patriarchy, including the expectations for girls and women to stay chaste.
September and October are warm but without the oppressiveness of the summer months.