orbit

(redirected from orbits)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to orbits: Priceline
References in classic literature ?
If this planet has any atmosphere at all, it is one of no great density, and its orbit being without our own, we can easily trace on its surface the outlines of seas and continents.
It ended with the double hypothesis: either the attraction of the moon would draw it to herself, and the travelers thus attain their end; or that the projectile, held in one immutable orbit, would gravitate around the lunar disc to all eternity.
The astronomer must have his diameter of the earth's orbit as a base to find the parallax of any star.
Then there was a wild yelp of agony and the poodle went sailing up the aisle; the yelps continued, and so did the dog; he crossed the house in front of the altar; he flew down the other aisle; he crossed before the doors; he clamored up the home-stretch; his anguish grew with his progress, till presently he was but a woolly comet moving in its orbit with the gleam and the speed of light.
I am of another world," I answered, "the great planet Earth, which revolves about our common sun and next within the orbit of your Barsoom, which we know as Mars.
But Phileas Fogg, who was not travelling, but only describing a circumference, took no pains to inquire into these subjects; he was a solid body, traversing an orbit around the terrestrial globe, according to the laws of rational mechanics.
Unfastening the rope that had moored it to the tree, Jane pushed frantically upon the bow of the heavy canoe, but for all the results that were apparent she might as well have been attempting to shove the earth out of its orbit.
That object, called 2003 EL61, resides in the Kuiper belt, where it now orbits the sun at a distance of 52 AU.
The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.
and Russia have worked together with 13 other nations to design, build, and assemble the International Space Station (ISS), which now orbits Earth.
The computerized system is designed to automatically survey the skies for objects - asteroids and comets - which could pose a hazard to Earth if their orbits intersect.