orphan

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orphan

n. a child, particularly a minor, whose two natural parents are dead. In some cases, such as whether a child is eligible for public financial assistance to an orphan, "orphan" can mean a child who has lost one parent.

orphan

noun abandoned child, abandoned infant, bereaved child, castaway, child without parents, foundling, homeless child, orbus, orphaned child, orphaned infant, parentless child, twice-bereaved child, waif, ward

ORPHAN. A minor or infant who has lost both of his or her parents. Sometimes the term is applied to such a person who has lost only one of his or her parents. 3 Mer. 48; 2 Sim. & Stu. 93; Lo & Man. Inst. B. 1, t. 2, c. 1. See Hazzard's Register of Pennsylvania, vol. 14, pages 188, 1 89, for a correspondence between the Hon. Joseph Hopkinson and ex-president J. Q. Adams as to the meaning of the word Orphan, and Rob. 247.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although in intermediate regression models, paternal orphanhood was positively associated with males' having had sex, the association was not significant when the authors adjusted for household circumstances.
One point that is different here is the additional emphasis on orphanhood.
Because Bolano grounds exile in a sense of orphanhood, estrangement from the national community remains a precondition for the freedom to create new affiliations.
The second part notes the trends of orphanhood and increasing levels of development modalities.
Literal and/or metaphorical orphanhood divested children of their lineage, of their native traditions, in short, of their cultural heritage.
Orphanhood is one of the most conspicuous negative impacts of HIV/AIDS.
Her recent work examines the effects of HIV and AIDS on health service delivery in Africa; the impact of orphanhood on educational attainment; social determinants of childhood health; and the impact of early life health and nutrition on health and cognitive function over the life course.
The Bibles, the hymns, the recitations, the church camps, and especially the major national holidays had combined to become an unconscious astringent that scrubbed Korean and Vietnamese minds clean by breaking down the stains of war and orphanhood.
One is the rugged Jamie, with his cruel history of orphanhood and a sad life; the other is Lydia, a cleanliness next to godliness type, who lives under an oppressive mother.
Diaz's boys despise the father-figure, who often represents weakness and betrayal, and are thus drowned, as the novel's title suggests, in a "symbolic orphanhood.
Orphans and vulnerable children: As a cause of orphanhood, AIDS is exceptional in that if one parent is HIV-positive, there exists a high probability that the other parent is also infected.
The motive clause is significant: the Israelites' recollection of their own historical experience of slavery (which amounted to widowhood and/or orphanhood in that they were without legal, social and economic standing) should soften them in their own treatment of the disenfranchised.