outrage


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outrage

noun abomination, absurdity, abuse, affront, atrocity, contempt, contumacious, cruelty, dishonorableness, disrespect, harmfulness, hatefulness, horribleness, ignobleness, malevolence, maliciousness, odiousness, offensiveness, perfidiousness, wickedness
Associated concepts: moral outrage
See also: abuse, bait, cruelty, defilement, delinquency, dishonor, disregard, disservice, disturb, flout, ground, harass, harrow, insult, mischief, misconduct, misdoing, persecute, perturb, shame, vice, wrong

OUTRAGE. A grave injury; a serious wrong. This is a generic word which is applied to everything, which is injurious, in great degree, to the honor or rights of another.

References in classic literature ?
They do not deny that the slaves are held as prop- erty; but that terrible fact seems to convey to their minds no idea of injustice, exposure to outrage, or savage barbarity.
He appears to have systematically imposed a woman on Society as his wife who was not his wife, and to have completed the outrage on morality by afterward marrying her.
They plunder us, outrage us, beat us, kill us; but we have a little pride left, sometimes.
The way he went after that plump sister in the lace tucker, was an outrage on the credulity of human nature.
Mell, 'that I am not acquainted with the power you can establish over any mind here' - he laid his hand, without considering what he did (as I supposed), upon my head - 'or that I have not observed you, within a few minutes, urging your juniors on to every sort of outrage against me, you are mistaken.
Whether Miss Havisham, preferring to take personal vengeance for an outrage done to her house, might rise in those grave-clothes of hers, draw a pistol, and shoot me dead?
Thou art no outlaw, but a Norman a Norman, noble perhaps in birth O, be so in thy actions, and cast off this fearful mask of outrage and violence
Next, his right foot imprinted its sole on the black taffeta of a skirt which certainly had never before undergone a similar outrage in a similar place.
This outrage entirely put the dervish's advice out of the prince's head.
I will say it in one," replied Don Quixote, "and it is this; that at once, this very instant, ye release that fair lady whose tears and sad aspect show plainly that ye are carrying her off against her will, and that ye have committed some scandalous outrage against her; and I, who was born into the world to redress all such like wrongs, will not permit you to advance another step until you have restored to her the liberty she pines for and deserves.
How liable would she become not only to their contempt but to their outrage, and how soon would dear-bought experience proclaim that when a people or family so divide, it never fails to be against themselves.
The encouragers of the first mob never intended matters should go this length, and the people in general expressed the utter detestation of this unparalleled outrage, and I wish they could be convinced what infinite hazard there is of the most terrible consequences from such demons, when they are let loose in a government where there is not constant authority at hand sufficient to suppress them.