PACE

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See: patrol, perambulate, rate, step

PACE

abbreviation for POLICE AND CRIMINAL EVIDENCE Act.

PACE. A measure of length containing two feet and a half; the geometrical pace is five feet long. The common pace is the length of a step; the geometrical is the length of two steps, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, cyber security measures are being followed for smartphones, but life-saving devices like pacemakers are still vulnerable to hacking.
Beheranwala said, "Unlike most pacemakers that are placed inside patient's chest with leads (wires) running to the heart, the leadless pacemaker is implanted through a keyhole sized incision through the groin region into the heart.
The old pacemaker implanted for our patient has been used in our country for a temporary period because of social security policies.
Learning how to generate pacemaker cells could help in understanding disorders in pacemaker cells, and provide a cell source for developing a biological pacemaker.
A pacemaker is a small implantable device that sends electrical pulses to the heart to treat bradycardia, which is a heart rate that is too slow.
In two cases, the tiny pacemaker, about half the length of a cigarette, had to be removed and reimplanted.
Although today's pacemakers are lifesaving electronic devices, they are limited by their artificial nature.
Heart specialist Valentino Palermo said a pacemaker was the only option for Snooks.
The pacemaker is then connected to the heart via wires that can break over time.
Following CE approval of the Nanostim pacemaker in 2013, the company has carried post-approval implants in the UK, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Spain and the Netherlands.
Ordinary heart cells have been reprogrammed by researchers to become exact replicas of highly specialized pacemaker cells by injecting a single gene (Tbx18)--a major step forward in the decade-long search for a biological therapy to correct erratic and failing heartbeats.