panegyric


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Chapter 1 ("The Manuscripts") introduces White Monastery Codices GC, which includes both the Panegyric and On Abraham, and GB, which includes the Panegyric on Manasse.
A Scottish scholar of Celtic language and literature, Coira explores the panegyric code as it appears in Scottish Gaelic poetry during the middle and early modern ages.
Generals must bow down until their backs arch, Party members must go to lengths to invent panegyric phrases, and workers must celebrate the achievements of the Workers Party.
When the city was officially inaugurated in 1931, Robert Byron concluded in his panegyric in the Architectural Review: 'Sir Edwin Lutyens had drunk of the European past, and now he drank of the Indian.
While Stetkevych's introductory note (38) on the tripartite structure of the pre-Islamic panegyric ode, which Ka'b b.
s writings reproduced here may seem more distant to many today, such as a long panegyric on Thomas Aquinas or a passage in which C.
The poet declares his subject to be the aition for the temple of Palatine Apollo as a panegyric to the name of Caesar: Caesaris in nomen ducuntur carmina: Caesar | dum canitur, quaeso, Iuppiter ipse vaces ('My songs are being composed in the name of Caesar; while Caesar is sung, please, Jupiter, you too, take a break').
Former Labour MP Tam Dalyell wrote a wistful panegyric to him in an Independent obituary.
a panegyric to Brooklyn, whose details and place names I love.
Matt Welch's panegyric on French health care fails to mention a crucial element relevant to his case: Unless Welch pays French taxes, he benefits at the expense of those who bear the economic burden.
These words, with which Goethe begins his Roman Elegies (1789), his erotic panegyric to a celebrated city, hover above this photograph.
The principal strands of the tradition that are taken up are the dinnsheanchas or placename lore, political panegyric, and the women's tradition of personal lament.