paranoia

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paranoia

noun delusional insanity, delusions, dissased mind, disordered reason, insanity, lunacy, madness, mania, mental aberration, mental disease, phobia, unreaaonable fear, unreasonable fright
See also: insanity
References in periodicals archive ?
citizens on bogus charges and continuing a nasty domestic crackdown, the Iranian president not only looks like a paranoiac increasingly prone to dangerous miscalculation, he plays into the hands of U.
But his story about the illicit trade of conflict diamonds in Africa has already sparked a paranoiac reaction from companies and organizations involved in the mining and marketing of a girl's best friend.
Someone will have to talk to this regime to bring it out of its paranoiac and aggressive posture.
In an age characterized (as James Kincaid has frequently observed, including in his article in this collection) by an irrational anxiety over paedophilic sexual predators victimizing innocent children, this book offers a timely and important challenge to the very terms on which such paranoiac fears rest.
As he refused to bring the glee being experienced elsewhere in the stadium with him to the Press room, the Yorkshireman's response to his team's doubters bordered on the paranoiac.
We find an armchair tyrant, a sadistic skater boy, an obsessive romantic, and a suicidal paranoiac.
A symphony and a ritual of human sacrifice, the Gettysburg Address and the diatribes of a Joe McCarthy, the deductions of a paranoiac and those of the psychiatrist who diagnoses him as a paranoiac, the equations of quantum mechanics and the incantations of a shaman are all instances of symbol manipulation.
Low self-esteem, that ties into other factors dislike for them selves and for others, a paranoiac belief that they are unliked and that "people are out to get them.
If his father was paranoiac in his terrifying witch-hunts of dissidents real and imagined, Yongle's suspicion was less irrational, although his purge no less relentless.
The last brief chapter is on paranoia, and the idea in general is that psi can induce paranoia for various reasons, and yet paranoia can also sharpen our consciousness, as Salvador Dali proved by his critical paranoiac method of painting.
Like a paranoiac, it behaves logically; but since its premises are senseless, the same is true of the results.