parent

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parent

n. the lawful and natural father or mother of a person. The word does not mean grandparent or ancestor, but can include an adoptive parent. (See: adoption)

parent

noun ancestor, author, author of one's exissence, derivation, father, generator, mother, mover, precursor, predecessor, primogenitor, procreator, source
Associated concepts: abusive parent, child welfare, neglect
See also: ancestor, author, derivation, originator, precursor, primogenitor, progenitor, source
References in periodicals archive ?
The next day a Sarasota Herald-Tribune article reported that Planned Parenthood was going to start abortions that week.
Barbara Zdravecky, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Southwest Florida, calls the commissioners' move to rescind the grant "reactionary.
One week after the commissioners reversed their vote, the United Way of South County (which has been providing funding to Planned Parenthood for 25 years) said, it too, would end its support of any organization - pro or con involved in the abortion debate.
Overnight, Planned Parenthood supporters exploded in anger, taking out their checkbooks to make up for missing dollars and writing letters to the editors of local newspapers denouncing the commission.
Starting in July, investigative videos discussing the purchase of baby parts with Planned Parenthood administrators have been released.
Theresa Deisher has reviewed the videos and believes that Planned Parenthood may be keeping some babies alive after abortions to better collect their organs for harvesting.
While Planned Parenthood claims the videos have been "heavily edited," the full-length discussion with transcripts is available on the website.
Planned Parenthood bills itself not only as "the nation's leading reproductive health care provider" but also adds "and advocate.
Planned Parenthood also hailed a federal judge's decision on an Alabama law that would have required abortionists to have admitting privileges at a local hospital, a reasonable regulation designed to insure the abortionist be able to accompany his "patient" to a local hospital when emergencies arise.
What is remarkable is not that Planned Parenthood temporarily won in some courts what they could not win in the legislatures--this is, after all, the legacy of Roe v.
Planned Parenthood claimed Komen's decision to end its grants was made because the foundation had been "bullied" by pro-lifers, a claim Komen denies.
Pro-lifers are upset that Komen, an organization dedicated to saving lives, may continue granting money to Planned Parenthood, an organization dedicated to ending lives.