parricide

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parricide

1 the act of killing either of one's parents.
2 a person who kills his parent.

PARRICIDE, civil law. One who murders his father; it is applied, by extension, to one who murders his mother, his brother, his sister, or his children. The crime committed by such person is also called parricide. Merl. Rep. mot Parricide; Dig. 48, 9, 1, 1. 3, 1. 4.
     2. This offence is defined almost in the same words in the penal code of China. Penal Laws of China, B. 1, s. 2, Sec. 4.
     3. The criminal was punished by being scourged, and afterwards sewed in a sort of sack, with a dog, a cock, a viper, and an ape, and then thrown into the sea, or into a river; or if there were no water, he was thrown in this manner to wild beasts. Dig. 48, 9, 9; C. 9, 17, 1, 1. 4, 18, 6; Bro. Civ; Law, 423; Wood's Civ. Law, B. 3, c. 10, s. 9.
     4. By the laws of France parricide is the crime of him who murders his father or mother, whether they, be the legitimate, natural or adopted parents of the individual, or the murder of any other legitimate ascendant. Code Penal, art. 297. This crime is there punished by the criminal's being taken to the place of execution without any other garment than his shirt, barefooted, and with his head covered with a black veil. He is then exposed on the scaffold while an officer of the court reads his sentence to the spectators; his right hand is then cut off, and he is immediately put to death. Id. art. 13.
     5. The common law does not define this crime, and makes no difference between its punishment, and the punishment of murder. 1 Hale's P. C. 380; Prin. Penal Law, c. 18, Sec. 8, p. 243; Dalloz, Dict. mot Homicide.

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Best news of all though was that Alice Morgan - the parricidal redhead from the very first series of Luther - was back to no doubt help him out of this latest tight spot.
29) More important for the narrative, the plurality of "oracles" suggests that the house of Laius received more than one parricide prophecy: perhaps, this line of reasoning suggests, for more than one ill-fated, potentially parricidal child.
52) These ambivalent parricidal acts are illustrative of two ways in which the feminine--and by extension the woman poet in particular--are positioned as aberrations to the masculine literary tradition as it was being shaped and imagined in this period.