Rectory

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RECTORY, Eng. law. Corporeal real property, consisting of a church, glebe lands and tithes. 1 Chit. Pr. 163.

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The judge said Parsonage continued to deny the offence and showed no remorse.
Ann Dinsdale, collections manager at the Bronte Parsonage Museum, said: "Although the Napoleonic battles took place far from the moors of Yorkshire, the Brontes had access to military accounts in periodicals and newspapers.
Holding: Without addressing the parsonage allowance's constitutionality, the Seventh Circuit held that the plaintiffs could not show they had suffered a concrete and particularized injury in fact and so lacked standing to challenge it.
Lew that the parsonage exemption "provides a benefit to religious persons and no one else, even though doing so is not necessary to alleviate a special burden on religious exercise.
The properties include 285,287, and 289 Parsonage Lane in Sagaponack South as well as 20 and 24 Gin Lane in Southampton.
Our home was the parsonage behind the white-steepled Methodist church, where my husband was the local minister.
Great-great-great grandfather Ira Parsonage was less than a month away from turning 106 when he died in hospital.
It's closer than it's ever looked to how it would have done in the Bronte period," Bronte Parsonage Museum collections manager Ann Dinsdale said.
It is being staged at the Parsonage Heritage Centre in Bedworth and spotlights what life was like during the Blitz.
The blaze broke out in a first-floor bedroom of The Parsonage, in Dunmore Park, Airth, Stirlingshire, at around 5am.
PRESCOT CABLES' Ben Parsonage has been in Korea spreading word about the 'Liverpool Way'.
And Catherine, from Blaydon, Gateshead, has also captured the sounds of the parsonage where the girls lived, which is now a museum run by the Bront Society, celebrating the lives and words of the famous Victorians.