partisanship


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partisanship

noun advocacy, blind allegiance, blind sponsor, blind support, blind sympathy, proselytism, sectarran allegiance, unfair allegiance, unjust allegiance, zealotry
Associated concepts: election law
See also: bias, constituency, faction, favor, favoritism, indorsement, inequity, injustice, nepotism, partiality, preconception, predilection, prejudice
References in periodicals archive ?
The development of partisanship can be viewed as an indicator for the level of party system institutionalization.
The Democrats, once again in power, must take heed of the lesson of recent years that excessive partisanship and political corruption have no place in American government, especially during these difficult times.
Greatly outnumbered, women have been unable to afford to operate like their male counterparts, and have worked across party lines even at the height of partisanship.
In the Clinton years, we have demonstrations of congressional deference combined with partisan attack, when the Democrats controlled both branches of government, after the Republicans swept to power in the 1994 elections, and finally at the very peak of partisanship in the midst of the Clinton impeachment hearings and trial.
His reasoning was that last year's five special legislative sessions were mostly ineffective because of high-octane partisanship that permeated the lawmakers' deliberations.
President, any effort by the White House to advance charitable choice in the foreseeable future has the potential to turn the national sentiment away from feelings of unity and patriotism and back to the contentiousness and partisanship that were so evident before September 11," the groups argued.
Hitchens has sought, like George Orwell, to turn political writing into an art, his starting point being "a feeling of partisanship, a sense of injustice.
Partisanship itself appeared to be selfish and lazy: a new model of citizenship that stressed education before casting an (informed) ballot replaced exuberant party loyalty.
Editors of liberal newspapers and media, including Toronto's Globe and Star, pooh-poohed the proceedings, mocked the Republicans, claimed it was pure partisanship, and denied that this had anything to do with the welfare of the United States.
The revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 enshrined this confessional partisanship into a sweeping royal edict that effectively stripped resident Huguenots of their standing as citizens, with all the liabilities that entailed regarding marriage, property, and officeholding.
The potential evolution of Arkansas into a two-party state brings a certain amount of automatic partisanship.
In his second inaugural address to open the second term of his Presidency, the President asked the Congress to join with him to put aside partisanship in order "to move on with America's mission.