passim


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Passim

[Latin, Everywhere.] A term frequently used to indicate a general reference to a book or legal authority.

passim

‘here and there’.
References in periodicals archive ?
HUNTER, SEX WARS: SEXUAL DISSENT AND POLITICAL CULTURE passim (1995); Kathryn Abrams, Sex Wars Redux: Agency and Coercion in Feminist Legal Theory, 95 COLUM.
INTERNATIONALEN SCHIEDSVERFAHREN 14 passim (Karl-Heinz Bockstiegel ed.
Malina (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1993), 106-15 and passim.
Montgomery Watt, Islamic Philosophy and Theology (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1979), passim, especially p.
RUSSELL NEUMAN, THE FUTURE OF THE MASS AUDIENCE 48-74 passim (1991) (emphasizing the proliferating interconnectivity of digital networks).
For discussion of the racial nation as a central feature of modernist African American discourse, see Baker passim.
A rationale for the concept "Baroque period" is implied only in passim by stating that "to engage the passions" was "one of the principal unifying artistic aims of the Baroque period" (p.
9-13, ably served by Richardson and comments by others passim, as usual fails to receive enough of its due.
Medical Group Management Journal 38(4):84,86,88 passim, July-Aug.
The band is also playing tomorrow at Club Passim in Cambridge.
OER, 3:1-2; OER, 4:116-17; Spitz and Tinsley, 32-40, 376 et passim.