pasturage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pasturage

in Scots property law, the servitude right to feed cattle or sheep on the land of another.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, extensive flooding during the wet season can limit the number of cattle raised on a piece of land to the pasturage available when much of the land is submerged.
And Thomas de Quinton (Quinton Road derives its name from him) was the keeper of its pasturage.
all the land within our tribal boundaries has been taken possession of by the Government and white settlers; our hunting grounds are used for sheep pasturage and the game reduced and in many places exterminated, rendering our means of subsistence extremely precarious, and often reducing us and our wives and children to beggary.
Chenier acreage is used for pasturage of cattle, habitations, and roads.
were rights of common of pasturage, estovers, turbary, pannage, piscary and
Though infringements of the right of pasturage are punished without mercy, Cuharmal does not hesitate to pasture his herd on his enemies' land, at night, thus incurring the supreme punishment.
48) The Code Rurale, hastily cobbled together as one of the very last acts of the Constituent Assembly, asserted the rights of property without limiting the communal rights of pasturage and gleaning.
He argues that it is the environment of the farmer that is being described in the depiction of a rain-fed land, the farmer involved both in cultivating grain in arable soil and raising flocks on nearby pasturage.
The principle to be applied here is obtained from one authoritative saying of the Prophet: "People have common rights in regard to water and pasturage and fire".
Before the introduction of the virus in 1953, rabbits feeding on acorns and browsing on oak seedlings maintained an open grassland, even without pasturage of sheep or cattle.
3) At least in the thirteenth century Genghis Khan had a more practical purpose: the Mongols needed more pasturage for horses
This explanation for the occasion for the poem has also been confirmed by Rogers and earlier annotators as a related series of events which took place in the Irish House of Commons during 1734-5 - culminating in legislation bringing about the removal of pasturage tithes - and Swift's anger at this legislation.