Pastures

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PASTURES, pastures. The land on which beasts are fed; and by a grant of pastures the land itself passes. 1 Thorn. Co, Litt. 202.

References in classic literature ?
Think of a man's swinging dumbbells for his health, when those springs are bubbling up in far-off pastures unsought by him!
The path led at first through undulating grounds, and thence to a plateau, where pastures and tilled fields alternated.
In a single night a swoop was made through the neighboring pastures by the Blackfeet, and eighty-six of the finest horses carried off.
He would go struggling through the pasture, unable to see twenty-five feet ahead of him, the cold dew or snow soaking through his overalls, his shoes becoming wet.
He, too, was sorry then that, owing to her backwardness, he had not observed her; and with that in his mind he left the pasture.
I am sure Andrew would do even more in my place," she thought as she went out in the twilight toward the crowd standing on the pasture by the barn.
Only a chechaquo'd fool around that pasture long enough to fill a pan of dirt.
A scamper across the pasture, a jackrabbit rising suddenly under the horse's feet, a violent sheer, a stumble, a fall to earth, and a broken leg for the master, was the cause of it.
At last, however, they fell a-quarrelling among themselves, and each went off to pasture alone in a separate corner of the field.
Beyond this road lay a close-cropped pasture of some ten acres, level and without a tree, rock, or any natural or artificial object on its surface.
In the inhabited parts we bought a little firewood, hired pasture for the animals, and bivouacked in the corner of the same field with them.
An afternoon sufficed to lay out the land into orchard, wood-lot, and pasture, and to decide what fine oaks or pines should be left to stand before the door, and whence each blasted tree could be seen to the best advantage; and then I let it lie, fallow, perchance, for a man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.