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Those "standards" routinely recommend one or more of thousands of patent medicines (also known as "drugs" or "pharmaceuticals") for nearly any health condition, even though it's perfectly obvious that no health problem has ever been caused by a deficiency of patent medicines
In 1905, Samuel Hopkins Adams investigated the patent medicine industry for Collier's Weekly.
His collection included a number of ads for patent medicines from the early 1900s.
It wasn't the ingredients that made this tonic famous; it was the promotion and the patent medicine companies were very good at this.
Once a patent medicine gained a sufficient reputation, then there would be soon be even more unscrupulous quacks out there who would be pirating it.
Phaedra Livingstone, an assistant professor and museum studies coordinator in the University of Oregon Arts Administration Program, presented "Snake Oil and Mothers' Milk: Victorian Patent Medicine Advertising" to a small but keenly interested audience.
The tragic history of laudanum, morphine and patent medicines.
But the patent medicine industry was particularly strong in the South, and initial reports from both the AMA and Massengill attempted to limit the scope of the problem by emphasizing that one group of patients had been seeing a "Negro" doctor.
Which patent medicine was advertised as being able to 'fortify the over-forties'?
The Pure Food and Drug Act came into effect on January 1st, 1907--the first step toward the creation of the modern Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and a step forward from the dangerous anarchy of the patent medicine era.
But he also loves the deceptiveness of the human soul, which manifests not only in the two main characters but in a variety of horse thieves, bank robbers, railroad toughs, religious hypocrites and patent medicine hawkers encountered on the journey.
It was then sold as a patent medicine because people believed carbonated water was good for you.