Pauper


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Pauper

An impoverished person who is supported at public expense; an indigent litigant who is permitted to sue or defend without paying costs; an impoverished criminal defendant who has a right to receive legal services without charge.

PAUPER. One so poor that he must be supported at the public expense.
    2. The statutes of the several states make ample provisions for the support of the poor. It is not within the plan of this work even to give an abstract of such extensive legislation. Vide 16 Vin. Ab. 259; Botts on the Poor Laws; Woodf. Landl. & Ten. 901.

References in periodicals archive ?
A sentinel, thinking Edward is a pauper, throws him off the palace grounds, and a period of privation, humiliation, and danger ensues for Edward.
A cornucopia of book marks are offered by the Peter Pauper Press ranging from a traditional "Never Judge a Book by Its Movie" (a beaded bookmark in a clear plastic protective sleeve and measuring 2-1/2 inches wide by 7-1/8 inches high) to "Calligraphy i-clips" (a set of 8 laminated i-clips packaged in a clear plastic sleeve with each individual clip measuring 3/4 inch wide and 1 inch high) folded.
Pauper Capital enhances their findings showing that London saw much higher costs of per capita poor relief mainly because of its heavy use of workhouses.
However, Green also provides statistics indicating that most paupers were women, children and the elderly.
11) Many pauper children spent most of their lives in workhouses.
The pauper aliens were perceived as a threat to the livelihoods of native Englishmen.
If Jack and Jill Commoner had known that the pauper was really a member of Royalty, they would have been curtseying at the serving of every bowl of gruel.
s producing artistic director David Armstrong, just before the curtain rose on the premiere of a new musical version of "The Prince & the Pauper.
THE RULES BOOKS This itty-bitty mini giveaway from Peter Pauper Press rules
This volume contains a detailed study of the 13 Worcestershire Poor Law Unions between 1834 and 1871 that placed pauper children in workhouses.
Today's millionaire real estate mogul becomes tomorrow's pauper.
While the image of the humble pauper had splendidly exemplified the medieval ideal of pious acquiescence in one's God given lot in life, it was totally at odds with the new worldly emphasis on individual effort and aspiration, self-reliance and self-realization.