peer

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peer

n. an equal. A "jury of one's peers," to which criminal defendants are constitutionally entitled, means an impartial group of citizens from the judicial district (e.g. county) in which the defendant lives. It does not mean a jury ethnically, educationally, economically, or sexually the same as the defendant, although, in some jurisdictions attempts are made to meet those criteria. (See: jury of one's peers)

peer

noun associate, coequal, companion, compeer, competitor, comrade, contemporary, contender, corrival, equal, equivalent, fellow, likeness, match, mate, opposite number, par, parallel, rival
See also: contributor, copartner, delve, spy

peer

originally a person with a right to be summoned to Parliament and a hereditary right for his heirs to be so summoned, now created by letters-patent. Disputes as to entitlement are made to the House of Lords on the advice of the Committee for Privileges. The order of precedence is dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts and barons. As a result of reforms to the House of Lords in 1999 there are only 92 hereditary peers remaining pending further reform.

PEER. Equal. A man's peers are his equals. A man is to be tried by his peers.
     2. In England and some other countries, this is a title of nobility; as, peers of the realm. In the United States, this equality is not so much political as civil. A man who is not a citizen, is nevertheless to be tried by citizens.

References in classic literature ?
An old mouse was running in and out over the stone doorstep, carrying peas and beans to her family in the wood.
If you've got any drawing- room manners or a dislike to eating peas with a knife or dropping aitches, you'd better chuck 'em away.
At home, however, all will look bright and bustling as we children are set to shell peas or poppies, and the damp twigs crackle in the stove, and our mother comes to look fondly at our work, and our old nurse, Iliana, tells us stories of bygone days, or terrible legends concerning wizards and dead men.
Craig, the gardener at the Chase, was over head and ears in love with her, and had lately made unmistakable avowals in luscious strawberries and hyperbolical peas.
Dinah Shadd had planted peas about and about, and nature had spread all manner of green stuff round the place.
They would descend--he knew their ways--past the shrubbery, and past the tennis-lawn and the dahlia-bed, until they reached the kitchen garden, and there, in the presence of the potatoes and the peas, the great event would be discussed.
When Sunday came, and it was time for the girl to start, a feeling of dread came over her which she could not explain, and that she might be able to find her path again, she filled her pockets with peas and lentils to sprinkle on the ground as she went along.
I catch them in humane man traps, fire split peas at their legs, play upon them with the engine--resolve to free mankind from the insupportable burden of the existence of those lurking ruffians.
Tiare, when I told her this story, praised my prudence, and for a few minutes we worked in silence, for we were shelling peas.
This way and that skipped the four, like peas on a drumhead, but they could see neither to defend themselves nor to run away.
my dear fellow, it is nearly nine, and the landlady babbled of green peas at seven-thirty.
He said they were easy enough to cook, and that he would see to that; so we got ten pounds of potatoes, a bushel of peas, and a few cabbages.