peculate

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peculate

verb appropriate criminally, appropriate dishonestly, appropriate illegally, appropriate wrongfully, bilk, cheat, cozen, deceive, defraud, divert, embezzle, mulct, obtain money on false pretenses, obtain under false pretenses, pilfer, purloin, rob, steal, swindle
See also: bilk, cheat, convert, defalcate, defraud, impropriate, loot, misappropriate, mulct, poach, purloin, rob, steal

peculate

to appropriate or embezzle public money.
References in periodicals archive ?
The article mentions that the emir's eldest son, Ciroma Abubakar, had been jailed for six months for corrupt practices: it may be of interest to record that the court's original sentence was less, but that the DO of his own initiative reviewed the case, in the light of much heavier sentences recently passed on mallams convicted of smaller peculations, and in the interest of consistency increased the penalty (no further request for Resident's review or further appeal was entered, although the disbelieving Kaduna secretariat delayed action on vacating the House of Assembly seat until appeals were out of time).
With public attention frequently directed toward private sector scandals, such as the savings and loan debacle and junk bond fraud, as well as equally disturbing political peculations in the public realm, there is ample cause for increased attention to the field of ethics.
The personnel file may also contain references to earlier peculations that were misperceived as procedural exceptions.
For this reason the peculations of people like Drew were much closer to ground level, to the real stuff of productive activity, than, for example, the highly hypothecated transactions of today's junk bond market.
brought to light through the medium of [his] Journal The Sydney Monitor, a great many public peculations in this Colony and its Dependencies, and a great many public improprieties and immoralities.
With Equity securely in place, the only remaining proof of the gang's massive peculations lay in the "memory" of the infernal machine itself.
The poem's interest in peculation and porculation, a word glossed (and perhaps coined) in Henry Cockeram's English Dictionary of 1623 as meaning "a feeding of swine," is layered over an interest in heraldry, the lines punning not only on the boar crest worn by Bacon's servants on their liveries, but aligning this with Bacon's brief period of imprisonment, a frank in this sense being an enclosure for feeding swine (Early Stuart Libels, Miil).