peer review


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peer review

n. an examination and evaluation of the performance of a professional or technician by a board or committee made up of people in the same occupation. This may arise in determining whether a person has been legitimately discharged, denied promotion or penalized by an employer, or is found to have failed to meet minimum standards of performance and is thus liable in a lawsuit claiming damages due to negligence.

References in periodicals archive ?
Research into the state of peer review has reaffirmed our policy of double-blind peer review as well as pointed out several areas of concern.
Peer review is usually a very time consuming process and is often criticized as being too slow.
The possible early warning signs of sham peer review, as discussed below, do not represent an all-inclusive list, and the word possible is used because these warning signs do not necessarily mean sham peer review is imminent.
The needs of both the new writing instructors and the busy tutors are served by a menu that offers faculty members a number of distinct, though customizable, workshops that can be offered to their students: Academic Integrity, Close Reading, Conventions of Science Writing, Principles of Grammar, Thesis Development--with peer review as the most popular item.
EEOC, (48) which is the only Supreme Court case that addresses a peer-review privilege, and its context was academic peer review.
The risk management committee peer review likewise investigates the clinical facts and circumstances surrounding the PCE and renders a standard of care (SOC) determination ("SOC-Met," "SOC-Not Met," or "Indeterminate") and an attribution determination for each significantly involved healthcare provider.
The board expects it will enhance the clarity, comparability and understandability of peer review reports--a welcome change for all stakeholders.
The conundrum raised by the 11th Circuit's opinion is not in adding to the "mushiness" of federal decisions addressing when and under what circumstances a peer review privilege should be recognized, but in its failure to recognize how the peer review statute will be applied and interpreted by a state judge considering the very same privilege in light of the same or a quite similar case--for example, civil rights or antitrust cases--that was filed under state law.
If the particular state peer review statute does not allow for any disclosure, then a federal court should do the same analysis; if a state court "balances" various factors, for example, to first look at the peer review information before allowing it to be disclosed or limiting the time period when the documents were created, then, likewise, a federal court should arrive at the same result.
Under Florida law, all documents related to hospitals' peer review proceedings fall under the confidentiality statute and cannot be disclosed during civil litigation.
On April 16, the AICPA Peer Review Board issued Exposure Draft of Proposed Revisions to the AICPA Standards for Performing and Reporting on Peer Reviews, which includes a mechanism for firms to effectively comply with state board licensing requirements and increase transparency for peer review results.
Put simply, peer review subjects scientists' work to the scrutiny of other scientists in the same field.