persuade

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persuade

verb actuate, advise, align, bend to one's will, blandish, bring a person to his senses, bring around, bring over, bring to reason, cajole, coax, compel, convert, convince, counsel, enlist, exercise influence, exert influunce, exhort, gain the confidence of, impel, importune, impress, indoctrinate, induce, influence, inveigle, lead, lead to believe, lure, make one's point, make oneself felt, motivate, move, prevail upon, prompt, propagandize, proselyte, proselytize, rouse, satisfy by evidence, satisfy by proof, seduce, sell, suborn, sway, urge, win over, woo
See also: activate, agitate, assure, bait, coax, convince, counsel, exhort, incite, induce, influence, inspire, inveigle, lobby, lure, motivate, prejudice, pressure, prevail upon, prompt, reason, recommend, urge

TO PERSUADE, PERSUADING. To persuade is to induce to act: persuading is inducing others to act. Inst. 4, 6, 23; Dig. 11, 3, 1, 5.
     2. In the act of the legislature which declared that "if any person or persons knowingly and willingly shall aid or assist any enemies at open war with this state, &c. by persuading others to enlist for that purpose, &c., he shall be adjudged guilty of high treason;" the word persuading, thus used; means to succeed: and there must be an actual enlistment, of the person persuaded in order to bring the, defendant within the intention of the clause. 1 Dall. R. 39; Carr. Crim. L 237; 4 Car. & Payne, 369 S. C. 1 9 E. C L. R. 425; 9 Car. & P. 79; and article Administering; vide 2 Lord Raym. 889. It may be fairly argued, however, that the attempt to persuade without success would be a misdemeanor. 1 Russ. on Cr. 44.
     3. In England it has been decided, that to incite and procure a person to commit suicide, is not a crime for which the party could be tried. 9 C. & P. 79; 38 E. C. L. R. 42; M. C. C. 356. Vide Attempt; Solicitation.

References in periodicals archive ?
60-63), da Gama petitions with grace despite the difficulty implicit in his mission: he must persuade the Hindu ruler to accept commerce and an alliance with, as well as protection by, the great king (Manuel) who sent him.
Although assuredly impressed by da Gama's petition and favorably inclined, the Indian ruler also proves indecisive because of his superstitious faith in his haruspices, or augurs who, employing "diabolic sign and augury" (Bacon), [47] ultimately persuade him to reject da Gama's suit, arguing that the Portuguese will impose upon them "a strong yoak, which they should ne're remove" and "endless Bondage.
On the poem's fictive surfaces, as we have seen, the royal audience is consistently receptive to the cogency of the rhetoric; on the more historical surface, where the rhetorical speaker tries to move and persuade his empirical reader or primary audience, an analogous assent is hoped for, while the rhetorical strategies that are recruited are largely the same.
To better persuade, the petitioning poet draws an analogy between the arts of poetry and war, illustrating it copiously with details taken from classical history.
Moreover, once one agrees with Rainolde that "the ende of all artes and sciences, and of all noble acte s and enterprises is vertue," then it follows that "the vertue of eloquence" is to persuade "Princes and rulers .
Julius Caesar Scaliger, in his Poetices Libri Septem (1561), proposes efficacia as the rhetorical power, usually in the form of exclamations, addresses, apostrophes, and interrogations, to persuade one's audience to accept even an unpopular course (Kennedy, 12).
Human persuaders often exploit information about the people they persuade, and is an important reason why friends and family members can be the best people to persuade any of us to do something.
Suppose our proponent of fruits and vegetables learned from a friend that the stranger he was trying to persuade suffered from a chronic iron deficiency.
An artificial infant intended to persuade teenagers not to become teen parents typifies integrated simulation.
Because we expect this sort of behavior, we often regard someone trying to persuade us to do something, say, buy a car, with suspicion.
To round out these guidelines, we need to postulate a final "golden rule" of persuasion: The creators of a persuasive technology should never seek to persuade anyone of something they themselves would not consent to be persuaded of.
Some people might want to persuade others and consent to being persuaded of things that many find objectionable, say, to abort a fetus.