petit jury


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Petit Jury

The ordinary panel of twelve persons called to issue a verdict in a civil action or a criminal prosecution.

Petit jury is used interchangeably with petty jury.

petit jury

n. old-fashioned name for the jury sitting to hear a lawsuit or criminal prosecution, called "petit" (small) to distinguish it from a "grand" jury, which has other duties. (See: jury, grand jury)

petit jury

a jury of 12 persons empanelled to determine the facts of a case and decide the issue pursuant to the direction of the court on points of law. See also GRAND JURY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Supreme Court has clearly excluded from the fair cross-section doctrine's purview the composition of the actual petit jury as shaped through peremptory challenges.
Like the composition of a petit jury, the composition of a grand jury must comply with constitutional requirements; prospective grand jurors cannot be excluded from grand jury service solely on the basis of their race or gender.
2d at 728 ("[I]f a fully informed grand jury cannot find probable cause to indict, there is little chance that the prosecution could have proved guilt beyond a reasonable doubt to a fully informed petit jury.
51) Notably, Vaughan ascribed that heightened level of knowledge not to the "vicinage in general" but to the hundredors, whose presence on the petit jury had declined significantly in the sixteenth century (52) and who probably lacked any particular expertise in any case.
69) Such a presumption would also fly in the face of the well-recognized fact that there is a significant body of litigation over petit jury instructions.
62) The Court carefully emphasized the fact that although the petit jury must derive from a representative cross-section of the community, "defendants are not entitled to a jury of any particular composition," and the decision imposes "no requirement that petit juries actually chosen must mirror the community and reflect the various and distinctive groups in the population.
The Court's pre-Batson cases on grand and petit jury discrimination reflected a commitment to the view that one might rationally glean some hint of a person's perspective from his or her race or gender.
121) Finally, the defendant must show that these facts and other relevant circumstances raise an inference that the prosecutor excluded veniremen from the petit jury on account of their race.
Widely variant interpretations can, however, stem from the third required element, "that these facts and any other relevant circumstances raise an inference that the prosecutor used that practice to exclude the veniremen from the petit jury on account of their race.
Since there was no constitutional or statutory guarantee of "precise proportional representation of on minority groups on grand or petit jury panels,"(37) one African-American more or less on a panel of sixty could hardly be said to deprive the defendant of a fair cross-section.
that prejudice would be present within any jury pool or petit jury.