petit jury


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Petit Jury

The ordinary panel of twelve persons called to issue a verdict in a civil action or a criminal prosecution.

Petit jury is used interchangeably with petty jury.

petit jury

n. old-fashioned name for the jury sitting to hear a lawsuit or criminal prosecution, called "petit" (small) to distinguish it from a "grand" jury, which has other duties. (See: jury, grand jury)

petit jury

a jury of 12 persons empanelled to determine the facts of a case and decide the issue pursuant to the direction of the court on points of law. See also GRAND JURY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The grand jury and the petit jury have entirely different purposes and functions.
41) If a defendant never had a chance at a representative jury, then the process of empaneling a petit jury from an underrepresentative group will likely raise doubts in the minds of the accused and the public about the fairness of the proceedings.
239) Sullivan & Nachman, supra note 30, at 1053 ("[T]he grand jury gives the prosecutor a feel for how the case will appear to a petit jury.
Not surprisingly, the conceptualization of the jury that surfaced in the American colonies bore a striking resemblance to the petit jury described by English treatises, upon which the Framers heavily relied.
Similarly, Tory Roger North defended the "probable cause" doctrine in his book Examen, writing that if the evidence before the grand jury "be lawful and full," it must return the indictment and leave it to the petit jury to judge the circumstances and the credibility of the witnesses.
a greater cross-section of the community than the petit jury.
Litigants do not have the opportunity to select their most preferred jurors from the jury venire in determining the petit jury that hears their case, and instead have only a negative right to challenge their least preferred jurors.
FREQUENTLY USED WORDS AND PHRASES (No Change) GRAND JURY AND PETIT JURY DISTINGUISHED
6) These options, however, applied only to petit jury trials, not to grand jury proceedings, and it was in this latter context that Bushell's Case would first command public attention.
The law has always presumed that the petit jury is also one of those governmental institutions that operates better in the dark.