phonate

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I invite voice teachers and coaches to come to my clinic with their students to see their vocal folds, watch endoscopically as their larynxes move through phonatory tasks, to participate in our multidisciplinary discussion, and to be partners with us in the ongoing care of these precious voices.
After closure of this surrogate glottis (fistula), a new glottis would be required for respiratory and phonatory functions.
Removal of the larynx, with the loss of phonatory function and the need for a permanent tracheostomy, has dramatic consequences for the patient.
Effects of biofeedback in phonatory disorders and phonatory performance: A systematic literature review.
Botulinum toxin injection for adductor spastic dysphonia: patient self-ratings of voice and phonatory effort after three successive injections.
The first one, "Sounds produced by living creatures", is characterised by the manner in which the sound is produced, whether by using the phonatory organs, which is the default value, by the intervention of other organs, which usually is related to certain body conditions (breathing, expelling air or gnashing one's teeth), or like an animal.
Exercises are based on the LSVT treatment program; thus, exercises focus on increasing loudness and phonatory effort.
2000, The Phonatory Correlates of Juncture in German.
Specific types of struggle behaviors can occur at the articulatory, phonatory, and respiratory levels (Wexler, 1996).
Part 2 ("Laryngoscopy") discusses instrumentation, procedure, phonatory and nonphonatory movements, chest register, falsetto register, son file, trill, inspiratory voice, and laryngoscopic functions.
It is well-known that the articulation of /k/ and /d/ implies a complete blocking of the phonatory flow, and that /s/, as a fricative consonant, causes the jaws to close as in a feeling of hate.
so uniformly tonal as to suggest a tonal protosystem at a sufficiently early level, from which the multitude of both segmental and phonatory and tonational intricacies of the present-day languages could be deduced" (p.