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Pertaining to the house or home. A person employed by a household to perform various servient duties. Any household servant, such as a maid or butler. Relating to a place of birth, origin, or domicile.

That which is domestic is related to household uses. A domestic animal is one that is sufficiently tame to live with a family, such as a dog or cat, or one that can be used to contribute to a family's support, such as a cow, chicken, or horse. When something is domesticated, it is converted to domestic use, as in the case of a wild animal that is tamed.

Domestic relations are relationships between various family members, such as a Husband and Wife, that are regulated by Family Law.

A domestic corporation of a particular state is one that has been organized and chartered in that state as opposed to a foreign corporation, which has been incorporated in another state or territory. In tax law, a domestic corporation is one that has originated in any U.S. state or territory.

Domestic products are goods that are manufactured within a particular territory rather than imported from outside that territory.


(Household), adjective belonging to the house, domiciliary, family, home, homemaking, household, housekeeping, internal, pertaining to one's household, perraining to the family, pertaining to the home, relating to the family, relating to the home
Associated concepts: domestic animals, domestic duties, domestic employment, domestic fixtures, domestic purroses, domestic relations, domestic servants, domestic service, domestic status, domestic use


(Indigenous), adjective endemic, home, homemade, local, national, native, native grown, not forrign, not imported
Associated concepts: domestic commerce, domestic corpooation, domestic judgment
See also: internal, local, national, native, residential


slang expression for an incident of violence in the home between a man and a woman.
References in classic literature ?
Alice was more and more puzzled, but she thought there was no use in saying anything more till the Pigeon had finished.
And just as I'd taken the highest tree in the wood,' continued the Pigeon, raising its voice to a shriek, `and just as I was thinking I should be free of them at last, they must needs come wriggling down from the sky
It might have been chance, or it might have been skill, that produced the result; it was probably a union of both; but the pigeon whirled over in the air, and fell into the lake with a broken wing At the sound of his rifle, both his dogs started from his feet, and in a few minutes the “slut” brought out the bird, still alive.
What” said young Edwards,” have you really killed a pigeon on the wing, Natty, with a single ball?
One morning, whilst at his window inhaling the fresh air which came from the river, and casting a longing look to the windmills of his dear old city Dort, which were looming in the distance behind a forest of chimneys, he saw flocks of pigeons coming from that quarter to perch fluttering on the pointed gables of Loewestein.
Free, like a homing pigeon, he headed blindly and directly for the beach and the salt sea over which had floated the Arangi, on her deck Skipper in command.
Then continue, and see if you can find another letter from our mysterious friend, the pigeon fancier.
Great as the differences are between the breeds of pigeons, I am fully convinced that the common opinion of naturalists is correct, namely, that all have descended from the rock-pigeon (Columba livia), including under this term several geographical races or sub-species, which differ from each other in the most trifling respects.
Tell me," asked the Pigeon, "do you by chance know of a Marionette, Pinocchio by name?
Then he came at last to the palace, and there in the court lay the dogs asleep; and the horses were standing in the stables; and on the roof sat the pigeons fast asleep, with their heads under their wings.
Oh, they employ these pigeons frequently, to set fire to the thatch of hostile villages; but this time the village mounted higher than they could go.
The domestic cat that had gone wild and that preyed on his pigeons, he found, by the comparative standard, to be of no less paramount menace than a Charles Klinkner in the field of finance, trying to raid him for several millions.