pirate

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pirate

(Reproduce without authorization), verb adopt and pass off as one's own, appropriate, borrow dishonestly, copy, counterfeit, crib, help oneself to, make use of without permission, plagiarize, purloin, steal, take illegally

pirate

(Take by violence), verb commit piracy, commit robbery, despoil, lay hold of, loot, pillage, plunder, rifle, rob, sack, seize, spoil, spoilate, steal, take by force, thieve
See also: abduct, confiscate, copy, criminal, hijack, hold up, impropriate, loot, pillage, plagiarize, plunder, poach, prey, rob, seize, spoil, steal, thief

PIRATE. A sea robber, who, to enrich himself by subtlety or open force, setteth upon merchants and others trading by sea, despoiling them of their loading, and sometimes bereaving them of life and, sinking their ships; Ridley's View of the Civ. and Eccl. Law, part 2, c. 1, s. 8; or more generally one guilty of the crime of piracy. Merl. Repert. h.t. See, for the etymology of this word, Bac. Ab. Piracy

References in classic literature ?
He said it warn't no use talking, heathens don't amount to shucks alongside of pirates to work a camp-meeting with.
The right of the grim-visaged pirate upon the high seas is exactly the same.
Then the Doctor asked Dab-Dab to fly up and tell the swallows that pirates were coming after them in a swift ship, and what should he do about it.
We were boarded about the same time by both the pirates, who entered furiously at the head of their men; but finding us all prostrate upon our faces (for so I gave order), they pinioned us with strong ropes, and setting guard upon us, went to search the sloop.
8] An official report from Tonkin, received in Paris at the end of July, 1909, relates how the famous pirate chief De Tham was tracked, together with his men, by our soldiers; and how all of them succeeded in escaping, thanks to this trick of the reeds.
I answered that I was a rich merchant who had been captured by pirates, and therefore I knew no trade.
The great emporium of its commerce, the great reservoir of its wealth, lies every moment at the mercy of events, and may almost be regarded as a hostage for ignominious compliances with the dictates of a foreign enemy, or even with the rapacious demands of pirates and barbarians.
I went over and read, "Edward Spencelagh, master mariner, murdered by pirates off the coast of Andres, April, 1854, age 30.
No doubt some new sort of pirates, who explored the sea in their own way.
Dantes had always entertained the greatest horror of pirates, who are hung up to the yard-arm; he would not die by what seemed an infamous death.
The dark and fearful sea of the subtle Ulysses' wanderings, agitated by the wrath of Olympian gods, harbouring on its isles the fury of strange monsters and the wiles of strange women; the highway of heroes and sages, of warriors, pirates, and saints; the workaday sea of Carthaginian merchants and the pleasure lake of the Roman Caesars, claims the veneration of every seaman as the historical home of that spirit of open defiance against the great waters of the earth which is the very soul of his calling.
The black pirates of Barsoom, O Prince," said Thuvia.