place

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place

noun area, city, community, country, district, division, environment, locale, locality, location, point, region, scene, section, site, spot, state, town, vicinity, village, zone
Associated concepts: jurisdiction, long-arm jurisdiction, place of domicile, place of employment, place of resiience, place to be named with particularity in searches and seizures, short-arm jurisdiction, venue
See also: allocate, apportion, area, arrange, base, building, case, character, circuit, class, deploy, dispose, employ, fix, habitation, house, identify, inhabitation, instate, levy, locality, locate, location, lodge, marshal, organize, perceive, pigeonhole, pinpoint, plant, position, post, premises, prestige, province, recall, recognize, recollect, region, remember, reputation, reside, residence, role, scene, seat, set down, site, situation, situs, source, stand, status, structure, territory

PLACE, pleading, evidence. A particular portion of space; locality.
     2. In local actions, the plaintiff must lay his venue in the county in which the action arose. It is a general rule, that the place of every traversable fact, stated in the pleading, must be distinctly alleged; Com. Dig. Pleader, c. 20; Cro. Eliz. 78, 98; Lawes' Pl. 57; Bac. Ab. Venue, B; Co. Litt. 303 a; and some place must be alleged for every such fact; this is done by designating the city, town, village, parish or district, together with the county in which the fact is alleged to have occurred; and the place thus designated, is called the venue. (q.v.)
     3. In transitory actions, the place laid in the declaration, need not be the place where the cause of action arose, unless when required by statute. In local actions, the plaintiff will be confined in his proof to the county laid in the declaration.
     4. In criminal cases the facts must be laid and proved to have been committed within the jurisdiction of the court, or the defendant must be acquitted. 2 Hawk. c. 25, s. 84; Arch. Cr. Pl. 40, 95. Vide, generally, Gould on Pl. c. 3, 102-104; Arch. Civ. Pl. 366; Hamm. N. P. 462; 1 Saund. 347, n. 1; 2 Saund. 5 n.

References in classic literature ?
Margaret found a place as nursery governess and felt rich with her small salary.
When he was twelve years old he went to the old Bentley place to live.
It is a dull yet lurid orange in some places, a sickly sulphur tint in others.
Now she places a gingerbread elephant against the window, but with so tremulous a touch that it tumbles upon the floor, with the dismemberment of three legs and its trunk; it has ceased to be an elephant, and has become a few bits of musty gingerbread.
In low-class places, in the dead of winter, saloon-keepers would often allow one or two forlorn-looking bums who came in covered with snow or soaked with rain to sit by the fire and look miserable to attract custom.
It was the afternoon coach by which I had taken my place, and, as winter had now come round, I should not arrive at my destination until two or three hours after dark.
In his joyous caracole round the lists, the attention of the Prince was called by the commotion, not yet subsided, which had attended the ambitious movement of Isaac towards the higher places of the assembly.
Father," said Mercedes, stopping when she had reached the centre of the table, "sit, I pray you, on my right hand; on my left I will place him who has ever been as a brother to me," pointing with a soft and gentle smile to Fernand; but her words and look seemed to inflict the direst torture on him, for his lips became ghastly pale, and even beneath the dark hue of his complexion the blood might be seen retreating as though some sudden pang drove it back to the heart.
The precipices on each side were often two and three hundred feet high, sometimes perpendicular, and sometimes overhanging, so that it was impossible, excepting in one or two places, to get down to the margin of the stream.
There must have been places and conditions which made for greater longevity, greater size, greater strength than was usual.
The hills and the rocks are rent asunder in places, excavations expose great blocks of building-stone that have lain buried for ages, and all the mean houses and walls of modern Smyrna along the way are spotted white with broken pillars, capitals and fragments of sculptured marble that once adorned the lordly palaces that were the glory of the city in the olden time.
At night, one could distinguish nothing of all that mass of buildings, except the black indentation of the roofs, unrolling their chain of acute angles round the place; for one of the radical differences between the cities of that time, and the cities of the present day, lay in the façades which looked upon the places and streets, and which were then gables.