secondary

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Related to polycythemia: polycythemia vera, secondary polycythemia

secondary

adjective accessory, alternative, ancillary, auxiliary, collateral, contingency, derived, following, indirect, inferior, junior, less important, lesser, minor, subaltern, subordinate, subsequent, subsidiary, substitute, unessential, unimportant, vicarious
Associated concepts: secondary boycott, secondary evidence, secondary liability
See also: ancillary, circumstantial, collateral, contributory, deputy, derivative, extrinsic, immaterial, incidental, inferior, insignificant, minor, null, pendent, peripheral, plenipotentiary, replacement, slight, subaltern, subordinate, subservient, subsidiary, succedaneum, supplementary, unessential

SECONDARY, construction. That which comes after the first, which is primary: as, the primary law of, nations the secondary law of nations.

SECONDARY, English law. An officer who is second or next to the chief officer; as secondaries to the prothonotaries of the courts of king's bench, or common pleas; secondary of the remembrancer in the exchequer, &c. Jacob, L. D. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ischemia from renal compression was thought to be the mechanism underlying polycythemia in our case.
A prospective study of 338 patients with polycythemia vera: the impact of JAK2 (V617F) allele burden and leukocytosis on fibrotic or leukemic disease transformation and vascular complications.
Cerebral blood flow velocity in infants with polycythemia and hyperviscosity: effects of partial exchange transfusion with plasmanate.
Clinical profile of homozygous JAKV>2 V617F mutation in patients with polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia.
Treating polycythemia vera to decrease the hematocrit helps to prevent complications including thrombosis.
However, NOD without daytime hypoxemia has not been clearly documented to induce polycythemia [18, 29].
Porphyria, lupus syndrome, cellular immune deficiency, polycythemia, blood infection, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, coagulation problems and hemochromatosis.
A JAK2 mutation also shows up in people with polycythemia vera, which is marked by abnormal red blood cell growth.
It turned out I had a condition called polycythemia secondary.
The latter are classified as: a) stem cell dysplasia, as in thalassemia, sickle cell hemoglobinopathy, and hereditary spherocytosis; b) stem cell failure resulting in aplastic anemia; c) uncontrolled stem cell proliferation, as in polycythemia vera; and d) malignant transformation and replacement, as in leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and metastasis.
Patients with Polycythemia Vera undergo therapeutic phlebotomies on a routine basis to decrease their hematocrit.