poor opinion

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No doubt the youthful reader will have but a poor opinion of me after the last two chapters.
I used to have a very poor opinion of him too, but he, he's an awfully nice and wonderfully good-hearted man.
Not one ship in a hundred carries rods, and Ahab, --aye, man, and all of us, --were in no more danger then, in my poor opinion, than all the crews in ten thousand ships now sailing the seas.
if that is all, I have a very poor opinion of young men who live in Derbyshire; and their intimate friends who live in Hertfordshire are not much better.
This project could not be of any great expense to the public; and might in my poor opinion, be of much use for the despatch of business, in those countries where senates have any share in the legislative power; beget unanimity, shorten debates, open a few mouths which are now closed, and close many more which are now open; curb the petulancy of the young, and correct the positiveness of the old; rouse the stupid, and damp the pert.
So utterly lost was he to all sense of reverence for the many marvels of their majestic bulk and mystic ways; and so dead to anything like an apprehension of any possible danger from encountering them; that in his poor opinion, the wondrous whale was but a species of magnified mouse, or at least water-rat, requiring only a little circumvention and some small application of time and trouble in order to kill and boil.
She has been wanting me to go and lecture Brooke; and I have reminded her that her friends had a very poor opinion of the match she made when she married me.
I confess I had a poor opinion of you at first, but I have been so joyfully surprised about you just now; it's a good lesson for me.
It's been a good friend to you this night; or in my poor opinion, ye would still be cocking on yon stone.
Wopsle hesitated, and we all began to conceive rather a poor opinion of him.
So much so, that he tried to give the cook some idea of the "narrow squeak we all had" by saying solemnly, "The old man himself had a dam' poor opinion of our chance.
He was a cheerful, familiar, loudly-talkative old man, with a very poor opinion (as I soon discovered) of the place in which he lived, and a happy sense of superiority to his neighbours in virtue of the great personal distinction of having once been in London.