popularity


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References in classic literature ?
But much more frequently the same capacity which carries a man to popularity in one department will obtain for him success in another, and that must be more particularly the case in literary composition, than either in acting or painting, because the adventurer in that department is not impeded in his exertions by any peculiarity of features, or conformation of person, proper for particular parts, or, by any peculiar mechanical habits of using the pencil, limited to a particular class of subjects.
An over-scrupulous jealousy of danger to the rights of the people, which is more commonly the fault of the head than of the heart, will be represented as mere pretense and artifice, the stale bait for popularity at the expense of the public good.
On the fireplace were two vases in Sevres blue, and two old girandoles attached to the frame of the mirror, and a clock, the subject of which, taken from the last scene of the "Deserteur," proved the enormous popularity of Sedaine's work.
K- was then at the top of his vogue; he enjoyed a popularity due partly to his own talent and address, partly to the incapacity of his rival, the university professor.
The visitor was about fifty-two years of age, dressed in one of the green surtouts, ornamented with black frogs, which have so long maintained their popularity all over Europe.
They deputed ten of their number to wait upon the Duke of Orleans, who, according to his custom, affected popularity.
Hancock, though he loved his country, yet thought quite as much of his own popularity as he did of the people's rights.
His popularity soon awakened envy among the native braves; he was a stranger, an intruder, a white man.
Cooper is ridiculing the habit of newspaper editors of seeking popularity by serving in the militia and thus receiving the title of "Colonel"}
You must make it quite clear to your mind which you are most bent upon, old boy-- popularity or usefulness--else you may happen to miss both.
Melville would have been more than mortal if he had been indifferent to his loss of popularity.
When these movements had subsided, the Judge remarked pleasantly: Well, Betty, I find you retain your popularity through all weathers, against all rivals, and among all religions.