positive

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positive

(Confident), adjective assured, believing, certus, convinced, decided, decisive, definite, fully convinced, insistent, perfectly sure, persuaded, reassured, satisfied, secure, self-assured, self-confident, sure, trusting, undoubting, unhesitating, unquestioning, unshaken, untroubled, unwavering
Associated concepts: positive identification

positive

(Incontestable), adjective absolute, authentic, axiomatic, axiomatical, beyond all quession, beyond doubt, categorical, certain, clear, conclusive, decided, definite, determinate, evident, explicit, final, inappealable, incontestable, incontrovertible, indisputable, inescapable, infallible, irrefragable, irrefutable, past dispute, precise, reliable, sound, sure, true, unanswerable, unchallengeable, unconfutable, unequivocal, unerring, unimpeachable, unmistakable, unqualified, unquestionable, unrefutable
Associated concepts: positive proof

positive

(Prescribed), adjective assigned, binding, commanded, compulsory, decreed, demanded, dictated, enacted, enjoined, established, exacted, fixed, imposed, instituted, issued, laid down, legislated, obligatory, ordained, required, requisite, ruled, set, stated authoritatively
Associated concepts: positive law
See also: absolute, actual, authentic, axiomatic, categorical, certain, clear, conclusive, convincing, decisive, definite, demonstrable, determinative, distinct, dogmatic, explicit, express, fixed, incontrovertible, indubious, inexorable, irrefutable, obdurate, peremptory, pure, resounding, secure, stark, strict, substantive, tangible, undisputed, unequivocal, unmistakable, unrefutable, well-grounded

LAW, POSITIVE. Positive law, as used in opposition to natural law, may be considered in a threefold point of view. 1. The universal voluntary law, or those rules which are presumed to be law, by the uniform practice of nations in general, and by the manifest utility of the rules themselves. 2. The customary law, or that which, from motives of convenience, has, by tacit, but implied agreement, prevailed, not generally indeed among all nations, nor with so permanent a utility as to become a portion of the universal voluntary law, but enough to have acquired a prescriptive obligation among certain states so situated as to be mutually benefited by it. 1 Taunt. 241. 3. The conventional law, or that which is agreed between particular states by express treaty, a law binding on the parties among whom such treaties are in force. 1 Chit. Comm. Law, 28.

POSITIVE. Express; absolute; not doubtful. This word is frequently used in composition.
     2. A positive condition is where the thing which is the subject of it must happen; as, if I marry. It is opposed to a negative condition, which is where the thing which is the subject of it must not happen; as, if I do not marry.
     3. A positive fraud is the intentional and successful employment of any cunning, deception or artifice, to circumvent, cheat, or deceive another. 1 Story, Eq. Sec. 186; Dig. 4, 3, 1, 2; Dig. 2, 14, 7, 9. It is cited in opposition to constructive fraud. (q.v.)
     4. Positive evidence is that which, if believed, establishes the truth or falsehood of a fact in issue, and does not arise from any presumption. It is distinguished from circumstantial evidence. 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3057.

References in classic literature ?
2) Image-propositions, which may be believed or disbelieved, but do not allow any duality of content corresponding to positive and negative facts;
3) Word-propositions, which are always positive facts, but are of two kinds: one verified by a positive objective, the other by a negative objective.
Be positive scientists, if you please; but ontology has no place in positive science, so leave it alone.
Esmeralda was positive that it was none other than an angel of the Lord, sent down especially to watch over them.
I miss something," he himself confesses, "common worship, a positive religion, shared with other people.
Duty has the virtue of making us feel the reality of a positive world, while at the same time detaching us from it.
Had they attempted to enumerate the particular powers or means not necessary or proper for carrying the general powers into execution, the task would have been no less chimerical; and would have been liable to this further objection, that every defect in the enumeration would have been equivalent to a positive grant of authority.
The boat at last became so nearly free of the retarding mud and of the bank that Jane felt positive that she could pole it off into deeper water with one of the paddles which lay in the bottom of the rude craft.
The most to be expected from the generality of men, in such a situation, is the negative merit of not doing harm, instead of the positive merit of doing good.
The name of Willoughby, John Willoughby, frequently repeated, first caught my attention; and what followed was a positive assertion that every thing was now finally settled respecting his marriage with Miss Grey--it was no longer to be a secret--it would take place even within a few weeks, with many particulars of preparations and other matters.
Could it have concealed anything like a fact, a piece of positive evidence?
psychology/ which /cuts both ways/, nothing positive.