post

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post

v. 1) to place a notice on the entrance or a prominent place on real property, such as a notice to quit (leave), pay rent, or a notice of intent to conduct a sheriff's sale, which requires mailing of a copy to the occupant to complete service of the notice. 2) to place a legal notice on a designated public place at the courthouse. 3) a commercial term for recording a payment. 4) to mail.

post

noun appointment, berth, billet, business, career, charge, commission, department, field, function, incumbency, job, line, locus, means of livelihood, munus, occupation, office, place, position, pursuit, service, situation, station, task, vocation, work

post

verb advertise, announce publicly, bestow, call public attention to, circulate, communicate, convey, deliver, dispose of, distribute, give away, give forth, give out, give public notice of, impart, issue, issue a statement, make known, make public, offer to the public, pay, present, print, proclaim, publish, put up a sign, report, spread, spread abroad
Associated concepts: post a notice, post bail
See also: annunciate, appointment, bond, book, calling, career, communicate, convey, deposit, dispatch, employment, enter, induct, inform, inscribe, issue, itemize, location, notify, occupation, office, organ, pawn, pledge, position, publish, pursuit, record, register, role, seat, send, set down, situation, stand, standpoint, title, trade, work

POST. After. When two or more alienations or descents have taken place between an original intruder ant or defendant in a writ of entry, the writ is said to be in the post, because it states that the tenant had not entry unless after the ouster of the original intruder. 3 Bl. Com. 182. See Entry, limit of.

References in classic literature ?
he would shout, and the big fight between Kala Nag and the wild elephant would sway to and fro across the Keddah, and the old elephant catchers would wipe the sweat out of their eyes, and find time to nod to Little Toomai wriggling with joy on the top of the posts.
In pleasant conversation of this sort they passed out of the tent into the wood, and the day was spent in visiting some of the posts and hiding-places, and then night closed in, not, however, as brilliantly or tranquilly as might have been expected at the season, for it was then midsummer; but bringing with it a kind of haze that greatly aided the project of the duke and duchess; and thus, as night began to fall, and a little after twilight set in, suddenly the whole wood on all four sides seemed to be on fire, and shortly after, here, there, on all sides, a vast number of trumpets and other military instruments were heard, as if several troops of cavalry were passing through the wood.
The American fur companies keep no established posts beyond the mountains.
A post of four men slept in safety in a corner, so certain were they that the attack would not take place on that side.
The Canadian traders, for a long time, had troublesome competitors in the British merchants of New York, who inveigled the Indian hunters and the coureurs des bois to their posts, and traded with them on more favorable terms.
Kindly return to your posts, gentlemen, all of you, all
Give me a bomb and when you hear it burst in this listening post let your men start across No Man's Land slowly.
Often we passed small posts similar to that at which the colonel's regiment had been quartered, finding in each instance that only a single company or troop remained for defence, the balance having been withdrawn toward the northeast, in the same direction in which we were moving.
The carriages, posts, people, everything that was to be seen was covered with snow on one side, and was getting more and more thickly covered.
I have carried him thousands and thousands of miles on scout duty for the army, and there's not a gorge, nor a pass, nor a valley, nor a fort, nor a trading post, nor a buffalo-range in the whole sweep of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains that we don't know as well as we know the bugle-calls.
The letter was inclosed to a friend of mine in London, with instructions to post it at Charing Cross.
After well considering the matter while I was dressing at the Blue Boar in the morning, I resolved to tell my guardian that I doubted Orlick's being the right sort of man to fill a post of trust at Miss Havisham's.