practice


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Related to practice: practise

Practice

Repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of similar kind; custom; usage. The exercise of any profession.

The form or mode or proceeding in courts of justice for the enforcement of rights or the redress of wrongs, as distinguished from the Substantive Law that gives the right or denounces the wrong. The form, manner, or order of instituting and conducting an action or other judicial proceeding, through its successive stages to its end, in accordance with the rules and principles laid down by law or by the regulations and precedents of the courts.

An attorney is actually engaged in the Practice of Law when she maintains an office, offers to perform legal services, describes herself as an attorney on letterheads or business cards, counsels clients, negotiates with other parties or opposing counsel, and fixes and collects fees for legal work. A doctor is practicing medicine when he discovers the cause and nature of diseases, treats illnesses and injuries, or prescribes and administers medical or surgical care. Lawyers and doctors must qualify for licenses before they may practice their professions.

practice

1) n. custom or habit as shown by repeated action, as in "it is the practice in the industry to confirm orders before shipping." 2) the legal business, as in "law practice," or "the practice of the law." 3) v. to repeat an activity in order to maintain or improve skills, as "he practices the violin every evening." 4) v. to conduct a law business, as "she practices law in St. Louis."

practice

(Custom), noun behavior, common course, confirmed habit, consuetude, conventionality, course of accion, course of conduct, customary course, established order, fixed ways, frequent repetition, general course, habit, habitual course, habituation, habitude, inveterate habit, line of action, line of proceeding, manner, matter of course, method, mode, mode of procedure, natural course, order of the day, ordinary course, pattern, prescription, procedure, routine, settled disposition, style, usage, use, usual custom, usual method, way
Associated concepts: custom and usage, practice in the industry
Foreign phrases: Cursus curiae est lex curiae.The practice of the court is the law of the court. Multa multo exercitaaione facilius quam regulis percipies. You will perceive many things much more easily by practice than by rule.

practice

(Procedure), noun approach, arrangement, conduct, consuetudo, course, course of action, course of conduct, established order, exercitatio, form, general guidelines, governing course of action, governing plan, line of action, line of conduct, manner of proceeding, method, mode, mode of management, mos, observance, operation, order of the day, organization, outline, plan of action, policy, prescribed form, prescribed usage, process, program, protocol, required manner, routine, rule, rules of business, scheme, stratagem, strategy, tactics, treatment, usual way, usus, way, way of doing things
Associated concepts: civil practice, criminal practice

practice

(Professional business), noun avocation, business, calling, career, chosen career, chosen field, chooen profession, employment, life, life's work, line of busiiess, line of work, occupation, pursuit, specialty, trade, vocation
Associated concepts: practice of law, practice of profession

practice

(Engage in), verb be employed, carry on business, devote oneself to, employ, employ one's professional skill, employ oneself in, engage in, exercere, facere, factitare, follow a calling, follow a profession, follow as an occupation, labor at one's vocation, perform the duties of, perform the functions of, pursue, specialize, specialize in, undertake, work at
Associated concepts: practice law

practice

(Train by repetition), verb acquire the habit, apply one's self to, become familiar with, condition, cultiiate a habit, discipline, do repeatedly, drill, exercise, famillarize with, learn a habit, meditari, perfect a routine, perform repeatedly, prepare, rehearse, school, take training, work at
See also: adhere to, behavior, business, calling, conduct, course, custom, dealings, deportment, discipline, employ, employment, exercise, expedient, experience, guide, habit, manner, method, mode, occupation, operate, operation, perform, ply, position, prescription, procedure, profession, protocol, pursue, pursuit, qualify, resort, rule, system, trade, usage, use

PRACTICE. The form, manner and order of conducting and carrying on suits or prosecutions in the courts through their various stages, according, to the principles of law, and the rules laid down by the respective courts.
     2. By practice is also meant the business which an attorney or counsellor does; as, A B has a good practice.
     3. The books on practice are very numerous; among the most popular are those Of Tidd, Chitty, Archbold, Sellon, Graham, Dunlap, Caines, Troubat and Haly, Blake, Impey.
     4. A settled, uniform, and loll, continued practice, without objection is evidence of what the law is, and such practice is based on principles which are founded in justice and convenience. Buck, 279; 2 Russ. R. 19, 570; 2 Jac. It. 232; 5 T. R. 380; 1 Y. & J. 167, 168; 2 Crompt. & M. 55; Ram on Judgm. ch. 7.

References in classic literature ?
But results which depend on human conscience and intelligence work slowly, and now at the end of 1829, most medical practice was still strutting or shambling along the old paths, and there was still scientific work to be done which might have seemed to be a direct sequence of Bichat's.
He was certainly a happy fellow at this time: to be seven-and-twenty, without any fixed vices, with a generous resolution that his action should be beneficent, and with ideas in his brain that made life interesting quite apart from the cultus of horseflesh and other mystic rites of costly observance, which the eight hundred pounds left him after buying his practice would certainly not have gone far in paying for.
Because people don't fall off quite so often, when they've had much practice.
I've had plenty of practice,' the Knight said very gravely:
Most artists have this secret in practice, though some, perhaps, have not much studied the theory.
And therefore, guided by precedents, I must inform you that in practice cases of divorce may all be reduced to the following-- there's no physical defect, I may assume, nor desertion?
It must be admitted that the latter case is rarely met with in practice," said the lawyer, and stealing a glance at Alexey Alexandrovitch he paused, as a man selling pistols, after enlarging on the advantages of each weapon, might await his customer's choice.
This grave matron had several sorts of practice, and this was one particular, that if a child was born, though not in her house (for she had occasion to be called to many private labours), she had people at hand, who for a piece of money would take the child off their hands, and off from the hands of the parish too; and those children, as she said, were honestly provided for and taken care of.
The only thing I found in all her conversation on these subjects that gave me any distaste, was, that one time in discouraging about my being far gone with child, and the time I expected to come, she said something that looked as if she could help me off with my burthen sooner, if I was willing; or, in English, that she could give me something to make me miscarry, if I had a desire to put an end to my troubles that way; but I soon let her see that I abhorred the thoughts of it; and, to do her justice, she put it off so cleverly, that I could not say she really intended it, or whether she only mentioned the practice as a horrible thing; for she couched her words so well, and took my meaning so quickly, that she gave her negative before I could explain myself.
Jones's and went to my new governess, for so they called her in the house, and there I was indeed treated with so much courtesy, so carefully looked to, so handsomely provided, and everything so well, that I was surprised at it, and could not at first see what advantage my governess made of it; but I found afterwards that she professed to make no profit of lodgers' diet, nor indeed could she get much by it, but that her profit lay in the other articles of her management, and she made enough that way, I assure you; for 'tis scarce credible what practice she had, as well abroad as at home, and yet all upon the private account, or, in plain English, the whoring account.
Let none be encouraged in their loose practices from this dexterous lady's management, for she is gone to her place, and I dare say has left nothing behind her that can or will come up on it.
To allow CPAs a wider range of professional mobility and opportunity the Uniform Accountancy Act (UAA) introduced "substantial equivalency" to ensure that all CPAs are licensed and regulated equally regardless of where they practice or who employs them.