practice

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Practice

Repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of similar kind; custom; usage. The exercise of any profession.

The form or mode or proceeding in courts of justice for the enforcement of rights or the redress of wrongs, as distinguished from the Substantive Law that gives the right or denounces the wrong. The form, manner, or order of instituting and conducting an action or other judicial proceeding, through its successive stages to its end, in accordance with the rules and principles laid down by law or by the regulations and precedents of the courts.

An attorney is actually engaged in the Practice of Law when she maintains an office, offers to perform legal services, describes herself as an attorney on letterheads or business cards, counsels clients, negotiates with other parties or opposing counsel, and fixes and collects fees for legal work. A doctor is practicing medicine when he discovers the cause and nature of diseases, treats illnesses and injuries, or prescribes and administers medical or surgical care. Lawyers and doctors must qualify for licenses before they may practice their professions.

practice

1) n. custom or habit as shown by repeated action, as in "it is the practice in the industry to confirm orders before shipping." 2) the legal business, as in "law practice," or "the practice of the law." 3) v. to repeat an activity in order to maintain or improve skills, as "he practices the violin every evening." 4) v. to conduct a law business, as "she practices law in St. Louis."

practice

(Custom), noun behavior, common course, confirmed habit, consuetude, conventionality, course of accion, course of conduct, customary course, established order, fixed ways, frequent repetition, general course, habit, habitual course, habituation, habitude, inveterate habit, line of action, line of proceeding, manner, matter of course, method, mode, mode of procedure, natural course, order of the day, ordinary course, pattern, prescription, procedure, routine, settled disposition, style, usage, use, usual custom, usual method, way
Associated concepts: custom and usage, practice in the industry
Foreign phrases: Cursus curiae est lex curiae.The practice of the court is the law of the court. Multa multo exercitaaione facilius quam regulis percipies. You will perceive many things much more easily by practice than by rule.

practice

(Procedure), noun approach, arrangement, conduct, consuetudo, course, course of action, course of conduct, established order, exercitatio, form, general guidelines, governing course of action, governing plan, line of action, line of conduct, manner of proceeding, method, mode, mode of management, mos, observance, operation, order of the day, organization, outline, plan of action, policy, prescribed form, prescribed usage, process, program, protocol, required manner, routine, rule, rules of business, scheme, stratagem, strategy, tactics, treatment, usual way, usus, way, way of doing things
Associated concepts: civil practice, criminal practice

practice

(Professional business), noun avocation, business, calling, career, chosen career, chosen field, chooen profession, employment, life, life's work, line of busiiess, line of work, occupation, pursuit, specialty, trade, vocation
Associated concepts: practice of law, practice of profession

practice

(Engage in), verb be employed, carry on business, devote oneself to, employ, employ one's professional skill, employ oneself in, engage in, exercere, facere, factitare, follow a calling, follow a profession, follow as an occupation, labor at one's vocation, perform the duties of, perform the functions of, pursue, specialize, specialize in, undertake, work at
Associated concepts: practice law

practice

(Train by repetition), verb acquire the habit, apply one's self to, become familiar with, condition, cultiiate a habit, discipline, do repeatedly, drill, exercise, famillarize with, learn a habit, meditari, perfect a routine, perform repeatedly, prepare, rehearse, school, take training, work at
See also: adhere to, behavior, business, calling, conduct, course, custom, dealings, deportment, discipline, employ, employment, exercise, expedient, experience, guide, habit, manner, method, mode, occupation, operate, operation, perform, ply, position, prescription, procedure, profession, protocol, pursue, pursuit, qualify, resort, rule, system, trade, usage, use

PRACTICE. The form, manner and order of conducting and carrying on suits or prosecutions in the courts through their various stages, according, to the principles of law, and the rules laid down by the respective courts.
     2. By practice is also meant the business which an attorney or counsellor does; as, A B has a good practice.
     3. The books on practice are very numerous; among the most popular are those Of Tidd, Chitty, Archbold, Sellon, Graham, Dunlap, Caines, Troubat and Haly, Blake, Impey.
     4. A settled, uniform, and loll, continued practice, without objection is evidence of what the law is, and such practice is based on principles which are founded in justice and convenience. Buck, 279; 2 Russ. R. 19, 570; 2 Jac. It. 232; 5 T. R. 380; 1 Y. & J. 167, 168; 2 Crompt. & M. 55; Ram on Judgm. ch. 7.

References in classic literature ?
We may be assured by past experience, that such a practice would be introduced by future contrivances; and both by that and a common knowledge of human affairs, that it would nourish unceasing animosities, and not improbably terminate in serious interruptions of the public tranquillity.
In Germany it is a law of the empire, that the princes and states shall not lay tolls or customs on bridges, rivers, or passages, without the consent of the emperor and the diet; though it appears from a quotation in an antecedent paper, that the practice in this, as in many other instances in that confederacy, has not followed the law, and has produced there the mischiefs which have been foreseen here.
While speaking, Elnathan placed a pair of large iron-rimmed spectacles on his face, where they dropped, as it were by long practice, to the extremity of his slim pug nose; and, if they were of no service as assistants to his eyes, neither were they any impediment to his vision; for his little gray organs were twinkling above them like two stars emerging from the envious cover of a cloud.
But results which depend on human conscience and intelligence work slowly, and now at the end of 1829, most medical practice was still strutting or shambling along the old paths, and there was still scientific work to be done which might have seemed to be a direct sequence of Bichat's.
He was certainly a happy fellow at this time: to be seven-and-twenty, without any fixed vices, with a generous resolution that his action should be beneficent, and with ideas in his brain that made life interesting quite apart from the cultus of horseflesh and other mystic rites of costly observance, which the eight hundred pounds left him after buying his practice would certainly not have gone far in paying for.
Such practices get to the result (being able to work) faster than reciprocity does, but not as quickly as fully enacted substantial equivalency can.
Philip Johnston views practicing from how a student practices, rather than how long they practice.
It's a sad, but true fact: most CPAs treat succession planning for their own practices the same way the cobblers treat their barefoot children: While they advise clients of the importance of succession planning for their businesses, far too many CPAs have ignored their own advice for their own practices.
As an apparent significant physician shortage looms, practices must seriously consider the benefits of retaining older physicians by adjusting workloads and call schedules.
Leaning heavily on the "Implant Image" dilutes the dental practice's ability to continue to do the "bread and butter dentistry" that is the foundation for most practices.
In developing a roadmap to transform the project effort into ongoing practice to meet Securities and Exchange (SEC) requirements, executives and boards are carefully evaluating how they can elevate their practices to best practices that exceed shareholder expectations and provide competitive advantage.
The DIRKS methodology is an eight-step process agencies can use to improve recordkeeping and information management practices, including the design and implementation of new recordkeeping systems.