pray


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pray

v. to formally request judicial judgment, relief and/or damages at the end of a complaint or petition. (See: prayer)

pray

verb address a request, adjure, appeal to, apply to, ask earnestly, beseech, bid, call upon, clamor for, cry for help, entreat, entreat persistently, impetrate, implore, make a request, make earnest petition for, make supplication, obtest, orare, petition, plead, precari, prefer a petition, prefer a request, press, put up petitions, raise upone's voice, requisition, rogare, solicit, supplicate, urge, urge persistently, urge repeatedly
Associated concepts: pray for relief in a complaint
See also: apply, importune, request
References in periodicals archive ?
I pray our cars will be as warriors, and know the lands they
This study examined the degree to which the frequency of prayer was a meaningful factor in romantic relationships, including requiring that a potential date and potential mate pray.
Please pray for the government of Canada, the global economy, for people who are suffering in the current economic crisis, and the soldiers who defend freedom around the world.
I will pray for a church that does not decry an inquisition
This year the Church of England in Birmingham is trying to recapture the spirit of that tradition and is urging people to pray more in Lent.
Certainly, as a nervous flyer, I never board an aircraft without saying a few quiet words to Him upstairs and I did pray for England in the Rugby World Cup final.
We pray for Kim Jong Il to repent for his evilness and for the regime to fall, and also pray for the unification of North and South (Korea,)'' the Rev.
Let us pray that as the days ahead unfold, we may be prepared to own the faults that are ours and to forgive the faults of others.
Charles and companions to pray for a favourable turn of events.
To help you, try this Five-Finger Prayer: (1) Your thumb is nearest - pray for those closest to you.
JERUSALEM - and legendary BBC Scotland reporter Bob Wyllie is preparing to interview a Jewish man who's been going to the Wailing Wall to pray twice a day, every single day for 60 years.
The court also found no violation in the policy of strip-searching inmates when they were leaving or returning to an inmate area, noting that the inmate could choose not to attend a service because of the policy and could pray in his cell or common area instead.