precatory

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precatory

adj. referring to a wish or advisory suggestion which does not have the force of a demand or a request which under the law must be obeyed. Thus "precatory words" in a will or trust would express a "hope that my daughter will keep the house in the family," but do not absolutely prevent her from selling it.

precatory

adjective advisory, appealing, asking, entreating, expressing entreaty, imploratory, importunate, pleading, suggesting, suggestive
Associated concepts: precatory words
References in periodicals archive ?
This claim clearly clashes with the piqatlmidde conditional construction, in which all apodoses are either precative or imperative (or their negative counterparts), and in which likelihood is neutral, i.
A common feature of both pattern is that they constituate the majority of cases deviating from the otherwise obligatiory modal congruence (where precatives are linked via-ma only with precatives, indicatives only with indicatives), in such a way that a case of modal incongruence is generally a singal for one of these patterns.
A third-person rendering is probably better in light of the formal parallel with lines 248-49 (see presently) and the fact that there is a shift away from the future and precative verb pattern in this context.
l- form as the underlying form for lams of both the asseverative type (Arabic lam of emphasis, in-) and the precative type (Arabic lam of command, li-).
The verbs appear to be separate G and D precatives (3f.
Even within these figures, with the exception of a few precatives in-yds, there are no examples of second-or third-person optatives in main clauses, the only place where they could compete with imperatives; and forms such as hhavet, bhuycit, and gamydt, which appear in grammar books, are completely unattested in the Rigveda.
On the level of vocabulary, new and difficult words are encountered, whose senses cannot be directly ascertained by reference to Amarakoga, but must be apprehended through resort to devices yet untaught; the full panoply of verbal inflectional forms is exploited, notably aorists and mediopassives; the two futures are used properly and distinguished in meaning; precatives and conditionals are not infrequently met; though the noun is inflectionally far simpler than the verb, even here obscure categories are encountered, such as -r stem neuters or masculines in long vowels; syntax strains ever at the limits of intelligibility, testing the "Mallinatha" model, especially in the area of nominal compounding.