predeliberation


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40%), but also that this impact was not adjusted by deliberation (both 60% of convict rates in predeliberation and postdeliberation verdict).
mock jurors] have examined jurors' predeliberation disposition
He argues that "members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies" (2001, 15).
Doob & Kirshenbaum, supra note 94, at 94-96 (finding that evidence of prior convictions significantly increased the likelihood that jurors would find a defendant guilty, despite a judge's limiting instructions); Greene & Dodge, supra note 94, at 76 (finding that jurors who learn of a defendant's prior conviction are more likely to convict him of a subsequent offense); Hans & Doob, supra note 101, at 251 (finding that the presentation of a defendant's criminal record to a jury significantly increases the likelihood of a guilty verdict); London & Nunez, supra note 95, at 937 (finding that predeliberation jurors tend to be biased by the presentation of inadmissible evidence) ; Reinard & Reynolds, supra note 93, at 105 (finding that 'Jurors do not .
More specifically, group polarization means that "members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies.
In brief, group polarization means that members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies.
The foremost is the belief that jurors who engage in predeliberation discussions will prejudge the case before hearing all the evidence that is to be presented and instructions on the law.
After viewing the trial, jurors each filled out a brief form indicating their predeliberation vote.
From January 18 to 21 they were divided into groups; informed about national issues; talked about these issues in their groups; questioned experts, Republican presidential candidates, and Vice President Al Gore; deliberated some more; and were then polled to see if the opinions they reported in a predeliberation survey had changed.
For a summary of other studies on the influence of race on predeliberation preferences of individual mock jurors, see Sommers, supra note 43, at 172-79.
275, 282 (1983) (finding that in predeliberation assessments, white jurors were more likely to attribute guilt to Hispanic defendants than Hispanic jurors, but finding no significant difference after deliberation).
We lack a complete answer, but judges appear to be influenced by the process of group polarization, which occurs when group members end up in a more extreme position in line with their predeliberation tendencies.